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Series Index: Teen Titans v1




Teen Titans #1 [1966] to Teen Titans #53 [1978]

After their debut in the Brave and the Bold and Showcase, the Teen Titans were awarded their own series in 1965 and began their teen-oriented adventures with a trip to South America as members of the Peace Corps. Future issues would see them tackle such one-shot baddies as Ding-Dong Daddy Dowd, the Scorcher, and Captain Tiger while addressing the issues which affected teens the most. Wherever teens were in trouble or misunderstandings existed between adults and their offspring, the Teen Titans were there to bridge the generation gap. With a core membership of Robin, Kid Flash, Aqualad and Wonder Girl, the Titans would be joined on special occassions by Speedy before he would eventually take Aqualad’s place on the team.

With the end of the Sixties approaching the Titans also underwent a change in direction with issue #25. Gone were the super-hero costumes and included were new members of the team, Mal and Lilith, as well as a wealthy benefactor in the form of Mr. Jupiter. The Titans tackled social issues as never before, choosing not to use their powers and attempting to solve problems as ordinary citizens. This was followed by a period in which they returned to their super-powered ways while still being mentored by Mr. Jupiter, an era noted for its shift towards supernatural and mystery stories.

After the cancellation of the Teen Titans in 1972, the members of the team continued to appear in their respective regular titles. When the series was revived in 1976 it was revealed that the Titans had broken up and that only Mal continued to be involved with the team as the caretaker of their original headquarters. A plan by Dr. Light to use the Titans as pawns in his revenge against the Justice League brought the team back together, and the reunited Titans continued to operate out of their original headquarters until they moved to the disco Gabriel’s Horn on Long Island.

During the Titans’ brief revival new members the Joker’s Daughter and Bumblebee would join the team, and an older member, Mal, would receive a power upgrade in his new identity as the Guardian before becoming the Hornblower. With their new headquarters and new roster, the Titans were joined by Titans West, a California based branch of the group. Now at double their usual size and with a branch on the west coast, the team appeared to be at the strongest point in its history. Unfortunately, low sales resulted in the cancellation of the title in 1977, but not before the team’s origin could be told for the first time in its final issue. The Titans would make one last appearance in the decade in 1979 in the Brave and the Bold #149 before being revived for a second time in 1980.


Series Index:
Teen Titans #1-53

Crossover Index:
The Brave and the Bold #54, 60, 83, 94, 102, 149
Showcase #59
World’s Finest #205

Key Issues and Storylines:
The Brave and the Bold #54: Robin, Kid Flash and Aqualad team up to defeat Mr. Twister.
The Brave and the Bold #60: Robin, Kid Flash, Aqualad and Wonder Girl team up as Titans; First official Teen Titans.
Teen Titans #4: In this flashback tale, Speedy joins forces with the Teen Titans.
Teen Titans #6: Beast Boy attempts to join the Teen Titans.
Teen Titans #14: Robin must summon his courage to defeat the Gargoyle.
Teen Titans #19: Aqualad leaves while Speedy joins the team.
Teen Titans #22: Donna Troy’s origin as Wonder Girl is revealed; Adopts a new costume this issue.
Teen Titans #25-26: The Titans forsake their costumes and work with Mr. Jupiter; Lilith, Mal and Hawk & Dove join; Robin leaves.
Teen Titans #44: After a two year hiatus: Robin, Kid Flash, Wonder Girl, Speedy, and Mal reform the team; 70′s revival begins.
Teen Titans #50-52: Titans West debuts and assists the Teen Titans in defeating Mr. ESPer.
Teen Titans #53: The true origin of the Teen Titan revealed; Speedy revealed as founding member; last issue.

Notable Creative Runs:
Bob Haney, Writer: Teen Titans #1-25, 33-43
Steve Skeates, Writer: Teen Titans #28-32
Bob Rozakis, Writer: Teen Titans #44-53
Nick Cardy, Artist: Teen Titans #1-32
George Tuska Art with Nick Cardy Inks: Teen Titans #33-39
Art Saaf Art with Nick Cardy Inks: Teen Titans #40-43


Series Index: Teen Titans v1


Teen Titans #1 [1966]
cover date: Jan-Feb 1966

Credits:
Editor, plotter: George Kashdan
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler, inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Artist: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: The Teen Titans join the Peace Corps in order to help volunteer workers in the South American country of Xochatan who are being menaced by a giant robot which the natives believe to be an ancient deity come to life. No sooner do they smash the robot threat than actual incarnations of the beast-god of a pyramid, which is due to be destroyed by a dam construction, begin to appear. The Titans battle the animal-deities to a standstill, until the temple is submerged on schedule and the creatures vanish, and Don Matanzas, a former oppressor of the natives of Xochatan, is revealed as the instigator of the threats.

Notes:
>> none


Teen Titans #2 [1966]
cover date: March-April 1966

Credits:
Editor, plotter: George Kashdan
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler, inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Artist: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: Garn, a caveboy, and Akkuru, his giant enemy, are frozen in suspended animation by a prehistoric glacier, and revived in modern times. When Akkuru menaces the town of Smedleyville where Garn has become a student at the local high school, the townspeople believe Garn responsible for the giant’s rampages. Garn’s girlfriend, Penny Randall, calls in the Teen Titans, who team up with Garn to defeat Akkuru, and Garn is vindicated.

Notes:
>> First Titans Lair, although not referred to as such until #5.


Teen Titans #3 [1966]
cover date: May-June 1966

Credits:
Editor, plotter: George Kashdan
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler, inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Artist: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: The President’s Commission on Education asks the Teen Titans to help deal with the problem of High School dropouts. In the town of Harrison, the young heroes discover dropouts being hired by Ding-Dong Daddy Dowd, proprietor of a custom hot-rod and bike shop. Uncovering evidence that Dowd’s operation is a front for criminals, the Titans go undercover as would-be drop-outs and expose his schemes, thus persuading his teenage employees to return to school.

Notes:
>> First appearance of “Ding Dong Daddy” Dowd who is patterned after “Big Daddy” Roth, famous model-car customizer.
>> The Teen Titans attend the wedding of Steve [Mento] Dayton and Rita [Elasti-Girl] Farr in Doom Patrol #104 following this story.


Teen Titans #4 [1966]
cover date: July-August 1966

Credits:
Editor, plotter: George Kashdan
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler, inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Artist: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: In this flashback tale, Speedy joins forces with the Teen Titans on a two-fold mission: to locate a missing Olympic contender, and to prevent the disruption of the Olympics by DIAELO, an international hate group. Once found, runaway Davey Bradley, afraid to compete in case he might lose and disappoint his father, a disabled former runner, joins the Titans at the games, albeit in disguise. When the Titans are captured by DIABLO agents and set up as targets for an unwitting blindfolded Speedy, young Bradley acts to turn the tables, enabling the junior super-heroes to escape and capture their foes, which in turn gives him the courage to rejoin the competition.

Notes:
>> First Speedy appearance in the Teen Titans. This is an Untold Tale “from the secret files of the Teen Titans” and occurs between the origin of the Teen Titans, revealed in issue #53, and The Brave and the Bold #60.


Teen Titans #5 [1966]
cover date: Sept-Oct 1966

Credits:
Editor, plotter: George Kashdan
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler, inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Artist: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: At the request of Dr. Paul Turner, head of the Lacklock Camp and a friend of Robin’s, the Teen Titans track down the Ant, a teenaged costumed criminal suspected of being a former inmate of Lacklock, Eddie Whit. The Titans learn that Whit is being blackmailed by his crooked employers. Together with Eddie’s younger brother and the inmates of Lacklock, the Titans lure the real crooks into the open and dismantle their operation.

Notes:
>> First “official” Titans Lair.


Teen Titans #6 [1966]
cover date: Nov-Dec 1966

Credits:
Editor, plotter: George Kashdan
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler, inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Artist: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: Frustrated in his efforts to be accepted by the Doom Patrol, Beast Boy tries out for the Teen Titans, only to find that he cannot join either team without his guardian’s permission because he is underage (at this point, Gar Logan’s guardian is Nicholas Galtry, who does not know his secret identity). Disgruntled, he joins a carnival run by Baltzer, unaware that the crooked animal-trainer and his hypnotist henchman are using him as part of a scheme to rob their audiences. Investigating, the Teen Titans disguise themselves as an acrobatic team, the Masked Mazeppas, and join Baltzer’s troupe in order to uncover evidence against him. When their true identities are revealed, the Titans are forced to battle a hypnotized Beast Boy in his many animal forms, before they are able to break his trance and team up with him to stop Baltzer.

Notes:
>> First Gar Logan appearance in the Teen Titans.
>> The Teen Titans learn Beast Boy’s secret identity in this story.


Teen Titans #7 [1967]
cover date: Jan-Feb 1967

Credits:
Editor, plotter: George Kashdan
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler, inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Artist: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: The U. S. Treasury Department sends the Teen Titans on a personal appearance tour of Europe with rock star Holley Hip in order to stop a suspected smuggling operation. The singer’s clothing designer, known as the Mad Mod, turns out to be the smuggling mastermind, with Holley an unwitting dupe, and the Titans and Halley together evade his traps and capture him and his henchmen.

Notes:
>> First appearance of the Mad Mod; Appears next in Teen Titans #17.


Teen Titans #8 [1967]
cover date: March-April 1967

Credits:
Editor, plotter: George Kashdan
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: Irv Novick
Inker: Jack Abel
Cover Art: Nick Cardy, Sheldon Moldoff and Charles Paris

Synopsis: The Teen Titans investigate when trouble develops between a townspeoples’ vigilante group and foreign exchange students in the town of Lansford. The conflict is escalated when it appears that one of the students, Hans Vernick, has stolen “Honey Bun,” an experimental jungle-fighter machine being developed by the nearby Lansford Research Corporation. The Titans must battle both the vigilantes and the robotic “Honey Bun” before they can prove that young Vernick only stole the machine to keep it out of the hands of Karl Lamer, a spy from his homeland who had infiltrated the corporation.

Notes:
>> none


Teen Titans #9 [1967]
cover date: May-June 1967

Credits:
Editor, plotter: George Kashdan
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: Irv Novick
Inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Art: Nick Cardy, Sheldon Moldoff and Charles Paris

Synopsis: The Teen Titans are asked to help quell possible violence in the town of Baxter Beach, scene of the annual spring jamborees of two rival colleges. Robin challenges the destructive energies of both groups into building a stone jetty to prevent the beach from being slowly eroded away by the ocean, thus avoiding a riot between the two colleges and between the students and the local authorities. But when the submarine of Captain Tiger, a modern-day pirate, runs aground on the jetty, both the townsfolk and the Titans are helpless before the pirates’ superior weaponry, until the college students come to the rescue.

Notes:
>> none


Teen Titans #10 [1967]
cover date: July-August 1967

Credits:
Editor, plotter: George Kashdan
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: Irv Novick
Inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Art: Nick Cardy, Sheldon Moldoff and Charles Paris

Synopsis: Robin and the Titans attend a bike rally in the oil ghost-town of Wildcat, only to be ambushed, one-by-one, by the Scorcher and his outlaw cycle gang, the Bike Buzzards, during the race. The Buzzards loot the surrounding area and take over Wildcat as their base, but when a long-dry oil well suddenly becomes a gusher, it creates a diversion allowing the recovered Teen Titans to counterattack and defeat Scorcher.

Notes:
>> First appearance of The Scorcher (no connection with the Scorchers in issue #3 or with the villain of the same name in New Teen Titans Annual #2; revealed as an agent of “the Fat Man’s” organization in issue #20)


Teen Titans #11 [1967]
cover date: Sept-Oct 1967

Credits:
Editor, plotter: George Kashdan
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: Irv Novick
Inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: Speedy returns to help the Teen Titans when they go to the aid of boy genius Willie Gregson, whose summer job is that of assistant to famed scientist Dr. Simon Finley. A criminal gang tries to blackmail Willie, whose father, now a respected businessman, is an ex-convict, forcing Willie to steal Dr. Finley’s secret nerve gas formulae for them. The Titans tangle with scuba divers and a fake sea monster before bringing the blackmailers to justice.

Notes:
>> Robin, Kid Flash, and Speedy unmask before their teammates in this story; this does not necessarily imply that the Teen Titans have learned each other’s secret identities as yet. This story takes place following the story in issue #14, as Robin’s unmasked face is first revealed to his teammates in that story.


Teen Titans #12 [1967]
cover date: Nov-Dec 1967

Credits:
Editor, plotter: George Kashdan
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: Irv Novick
Inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: D. J. Deejay becomes the world’s first disc jockey to broadcast live from Earth-orbit, but the Titans detect a code in his snappy patter indicating that he has run into trouble in space. After foiling the efforts of the Deliverer, an international criminal, to levitate Earth’s national monuments into orbit, they follow the disc jockey into space and defeat an alien being who bad been holding him captive while directing the actions of the Deliverer on the planet below.

Notes:
>> none


Teen Titans #13 [1968]
cover date: Jan-Feb 1968

Credits:
Editor, plotter: George Kashdan
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler, Inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis:
The Teen Titans find themselves reliving the events of Charles Dickens ‘A Christmas Carol’ when Tiny Tom Ratchet involves them in the secret dealings of junkyard owner Ebenezer Scrounge and Mr. Big, a smuggler with a strange device that recycles junk into ‘new’ goods. With the Titans playing the roles of the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future, Scrounge repents and helps them bring in Mr. Big and his gang.

Notes:
>> none


Teen Titans #14 [1968]
cover date: March-April 1968

Credits:
Editor, plotter: George Kashdan
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler, Inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: The Gargoyle, a former Teen Titans foe who claims he was unjustly imprisoned by the team, sows the seeds of doubt in the minds of all but Robin, enabling him to banish them to the dimension of Limbo by means of his mystic ring. Finally, Robin surrenders and allows himself to be transported to Limbo, so that he can fight the Gargoyle and his thralls on their home ground. Smashing the Gargoyle’s ring traps the villain in the extradimensional realm, and restores Robin and his teammates to Earth and normalcy.

Notes:
>> First appearance of the Gargoyle (appears next in issue #35)
>> The Gargoyle is later revealed to be a transformed Bromwell Stick [Mr. Twister]; Gargoyle and Mr. Twister revealed as the same entity in Secret Origins Annual #3 [1989].
>> Robin’s unmasked face is revealed to his teammates for the first time in this story; this does not necessarily imply that the Teen Titans learn Robin’s secret identity as yet. The story in issue #11, in which Robin, Kid Flash, and Speedy unmask before their teammates, must therefore take place following this story.


Teen Titans #15 [1968]
cover date: May-June 1968

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano and George Kashdan
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: Lee Elias
Inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: In search of a runaway named Ken Matthews, the Titans go undercover as hippies. With the help of a neighborhood guru, they stop a cycle gang from terrorizing the hippie community, and save Ken and his girlfriend from getting involved with mobsters.

Notes:
>> none


Teen Titans #16 [1968]
cover date: July-August 1968

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano and George Kashdan
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler, Inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: First appearance of Aliens of “Dimension X.” The Teen Titans discover that Hillsdale High actually is the secret base for an alien takeover, and that the school principal is one of the extradimensional alien leaders. Entering “Dimension X,” they rescue Chet and his fellow students from being trapped in the alternate reality and being replaced by duplicates. Kid Flash then uses his vibrational powers to sever the link between the Hillsdale High of Earth and that of Dimension X.

Notes:
>> First appearance of Dimension X.


Teen Titans #17 [1968]
cover date: Sept-Oct 1968

Credits:
Editors, plotters: Dick Giordano and George Kashdan
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler, Inker: Nick Cardy.
Letterer: Joe Letterese
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: The Teen Titans travel to London for a Command Performance at which they will meet Queen Elizabeth II. On a sightseeing tour, Robin becomes accidentally locked in the Tower of London, leaving Kid Flash, Aqualad, and Wonder Girl to retrieve the Queen’s royal sceptre, stolen by the Mad Mod, without the Boy Wonder’s aid. Their costumes gimmicked by the Mod so as to halve their super-powers, the Titans are unable to stop the villain, until the ruse is discovered and they change uniforms. Then Aqualad rescues an escaping Mod from drowning, while Kid Flash and Wonder Girl defeat his henchmen, and the sceptre is returned to the Royal Family.

Notes:
>> Second appearance of Mad Mod; Appears next in Teen Titans (second series) #2 [1996] as a reformed criminal and successful clothing designer.
>> The story for this issue was approved by former editor George Kashdan and edited by Dick Giordano.
>> The cover logo changes again as of this issue.


Teen Titans #18 [1968]
cover date: Nov-Dec 1968

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotters, scripters: Len Wein and Marv Wolfman
Penciler, inker: Bill Draut
Letterer: Jon D’Agostino
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis:
Interpol requests that the Teen Titans team up with a Russian super-hero, Starfire, to safeguard the Crown Jewels of Sweden from Andre Le Blanc, the self-styled “world’s greatest jewel thief.” Mutual antagonism spoils the joint efforts of the American and Soviet champions, until Starfire rescues the Titans from Le Blanc’s deathtraps. Kid Flash then returns the favor by saving Starfire from death on the subway tracks, while Robin defeats Le Blanc in hand-to-hand combat. The Titans and Starfire part amicably.

Notes:
>> First appearance of Lenoid Kovar [Starfire]; origin revealed; a Russian super-hero; given name revealed in New Teen Titans #18; Kid Flash begins his long-standing animosity toward the Soviet hero.
>> First and only appearance of Andre Le Blanc – a costumed French master jewel thief; character named after comics artist.
>> The cover logo changes again as of this issue.
>> The “Sheldorf Diamond Center” in this story is named after Shel Dorf, letterer of the Steve Canyon newspaper strip and organizer of the San Diego Comic Convention.


Teen Titans #19 [1969]
cover date: Jan-Feb 1969

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Mike Friedrich
Penciler: Gil Kane
Inker: Wally Wood
Letterer: Milton Snapinn
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: His plan to defeat the Justice League mocked by Headmaster Mind, an old JLA foe, Punch, a teenage would-be super-villain, vows to prove himself by destroying the Teen Titans first. Speedy rejoins the Titans, and he and Wonder Girl are captured by Punch when they investigate racial riots at a New England high school. At the same time, Robin, Kid Flash, and Aqualad are defeated by high-frequency sound and light devices while on a mission to a midwestern community. Reunited as Punch’s prisoners, the Titans use teamwork to escape his traps and overcome the youthful villain and his followers. Afterward, Aqualad returns to Atlantis for an extended leave, ostensibly in order to look after the infant Aquababy while Aquaman is involved in a quest for his missing wife, Mera (as shown in Aquaman), and Speedy becomes Aqualad’s replacement among the Titans.

Notes:
>> Aqualad takes a leave of absence as of this story; apparently departs and participates in the events of Aquaman #40-42 between pages 22 and 23 of this story, then returns to a later Titans meeting to announce his leave of absence on page 23, which occurs between pages 2 and 3 of Aquaman #43; appears next in Aquaman #43
>> Speedy, last seen in issue #11, becomes a full-time member as of this story.
>> The Titans are first implied to have learned each other’s secret identities as of this issue; the Titans appear together in their civilian guises in the second story in issue #22; and they regularly call each other by their real names beginning in issue #24. The revelation of their identities, never actually shown in a story to date, was probably arranged by mutual agreement following the Justice League members’ similar revelation, which was first revealed in Justice League of America #122, and which took place at about this time, between the events of Justice League of America #74 and 75.
>> Speedy and Wonder Girl begin dating following this story.
>> Following this story, the Teen Titans team up with Batman in The Brave and the Bold #83, in which they first appear together in their secret identities, call each other by their real names, and are revealed to have knowledge of Batman’s identity. The four junior heroes team with Batman in the excellent “Punish Not My Evil Son!” Bruce Wayne gains another foster son, who proves to be an agent working to undermine Wayne Enterprises. Robin gets his Titans allies to help him in trying to expose the malefactor. The boy eventually has a last minute change of heart and dies in Batman’s arms, having taken a bullet for him.
>> The cover logo changes again as of this issue.


Teen Titans #20 [1969]
cover date: March-April 1969

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Neal Adams
Penciler: Neal Adams and Sal Amendola (pages 11 and 12 only)
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterers: Ben Oda and Morris Waldinger (pages 11 and 12 only)
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: A mysterious costumed crimefighter called Joshua invades Titan Lair and enlists the Teen Titans’ aid in stopping a confrontation between police and teenage protesters. All involved are unaware that the protesters are being backed by organized crime figures, who in turn are pawns of the alien invaders from Dimension X. The Titans, together with Joshua and his brother, the leader of the protesters, halt the aliens’ scheme to release the Meroul Being, a monstrous giant creature, on Earth, but both the aliens and their criminal underlings continue to plot the team’s downfall.

Notes:
>> First and only appearance of Fat Cat, the leader of a group of ex-convicts and secretly an agent of an unnamed criminal organization.
>> First appearance of Joshua (David; last name never revealed; first and only appearance to date; a costumed crimefighter.
>> This story is based on a Teen Titans story by Len Wein and Marv Wolfman, which would have introduced the character of Jericho (their name for Joshua; not to be confused with the New Teen Titans member introduced in Tales of the Teen Titans #44) as a black super-hero, but was never published. For the full story, see the individual article.
>> Marv Wolfman used the name “Jericho” for Joe Wilson’s persona as an homage to this tale.


Teen Titans #21 [1969]
cover date: May-June 1969

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Neal Adams
Penciler: Neal Adams
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterers: John Costanza and Joe Letterese (page 1 and part of page 2 only)
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: On the trail of the criminals (from the previous issue), the Titans run afoul of the Hawk and the Dove, who are after the same gang for different reasons. After a brief altercation, Wonder Girl accompanies Hawk and Dove through a teleportation device to a gang hideout in Istanbul, while Robin, Kid Flash, and Speedy battle another segment of the organization in Berlin. Both teams are defeated and captured, but Hawk, Dove, and Wonder Girl escape in time to rescue Speedy from being crushed beneath a gigantic machine. Hawk and Dove, sensing their mystic transformation back into Hank and Don Hall about to occur, are forced to abandon the case, leaving Speedy and Wonder Girl to search for Robin and Kid Flash, who are still prisoners of the Dimension X aliens.

Notes:
>> First appearance of The Hawk and the Dove in Teen Titans (both in between The Hawk and the Dove #5 and 6).


Teen Titans #22 [1969]
cover date: July-August 1969

Credits:
FIRST STORY: “Halfway to Holocaust” (16 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Neal Adams
Penciler: Neal Adams
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: John Costanza
SECOND STORY: “The Origin of Wonder Girl” (8 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Man’ Wolfman
Penciler: Gil Kane
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Gaspar Saladino
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis, First Story: While Speedy and Wonder Girl battle an extradimensional creature that suddenly appears in the criminals’ control-room, Robin and Kid Flash, under the control of the aliens, are used to discover a third dimensional world, invisible to the Dimension-X-dwellers, which exists adjacent to both their world and Earth. Escaping, they rejoin their teammates in this adjoining dimension, only to be pursued by the aliens.

The battle between Titans and aliens is cut short when a community-intelligence being, the sole sentient native of the newly discovered dimension, takes on the form of a giant archer in imitation of Speedy, and drives the minions of Dimension X back to their own world. Promising that never again will beings from Dimension X use his world as a gateway to Earth, the “archer” allows the Titans to depart in peace.

Synopsis, Second Story: Upon the Titans’ return to Earth, Wonder Girl unexpectedly collapses, the result of a recently recurring series of fainting spells. In explanation, she tells the other Titans her origin for the first time. As a child, she had been saved from an apartment building fire by Wonder Woman, and taken by her to Paradise Island to live after all attempts to ascertain her identity or those of her parents (presumed to be a couple killed in the blaze) had failed. Becoming Queen Hippolyta’s foster daughter and Wonder Woman’s foster sister, she was unable to compete with the Amazons on a physical level, lacking their special powers, and so was given powers almost identical to those of Wonder Woman by scientist Paula von Gunther’s Purple Ray. Returning to the outside world to join the Teen Titans, she was forced to stay behind when the other Amazons sojourned to another dimension to recharge their magical powers (as shown in Wonder Woman), and had been secretly living in Titan Lair since that time.

Now, she takes the name Donna Troy as a civilian identity and moves into an apartment in Greenwich Village with new girlfriend Sharon Tracy. Later, she is contacted by Queen Hippolyta, who informs her that the Amazons’ use of the Purple Ray had been accidentally responsible for her recurring weak spells, a problem which has now been corrected. Wonder Girl celebrates her new life by designing a new costume and changing her hairstyle.

Notes:
>> Wonder Girl’s origin revealed in part; full origin revealed in New Teen Titans #38; real name, Donna, revealed; adopts secret identity as Donna Troy, and gets new costume and hairstyle in this story.
>> The footnote concerning the previous appearances of the Amazons’ Purple Ray in this story actually refers to the Earth-2 counterpart of this invention, which was used to revive the Justice Society members in All-Star Comics #38.
>> The events of the flashbacks in this story are ammended and corrected in flashbacks in New Teen Titans #38.
>> Sharon Tracy’s first appearance; becomes Donna Troy’s roommate.


Teen Titans #23 [1969]
cover date: Sept-Oct 1969

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: Gil Kane
Inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: The Teen Titans prevent a riot when rock star Sammy Soul runs out in the middle of a concert. Investigating, they discover the teen idol’s guardianship is a bone of legal contention between his only living family and his manager, with both factions only interested in the youth for his money. When Sammy runs away to South America to search for his missing uncle, a treasure hunter named Matt Murdock, the Titans follow, and arrive in time to rescue Sammy, his new found friend Juan, and an amnesiac Murdock from headhunters. Murdock returns to civilization to become Sammy’s legal guardian.

Notes:
>> Famous cover of Wonder Girl bursting forth in her new costume by Nick Cardy; A tribute to this cover is recreated by George Pérez in New Titans #55, the first appearance of Troia.


Teen Titans #24 [1969]
cover date: Nov-Dec 1969

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: Gil Kane
Inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: On a ski vacation in their civilian identities, the Teen Titans find themselves in costumed action when weird happenings plague the Indian-owned Medicene Mountain resort. Aided by ski instructor Eddie Talbow, the Titans discover the mishaps are being arranged by restauranteur Anton Larson.

Notes:
>> none


Teen Titans #25 [1970]
cover date: Jan-Feb 1970

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: Gil Kane
Inker: Nick Cardy
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: Titans encounter Lilith, a mysterious telepath/precognitive who uncovers their super-hero selves and warns them that “tonight the Titans will open the door for death.” Ignoring the cryptic prediction, the Titans soon find themselves involved in preventing a riot at a peace rally, fighting side-by-side with the Hawk and the Dove. In the midst of the action, while struggling with a gun-wielding protester, Hawk, Dove, and the Titans (with the exception of Robin, who has gone to alert the police) all have a hand on the weapon that discharges and kills world-famous philanthropist Dr. Arthur Swenson.

After being reprimanded for their part in the killing by their Justice League mentors, the young heroes are recruited, through Lilith, by Mr. Jupiter, one of the world’s richest men and the financier of a secret government-sponsored training project for teenagers. Robin declines Mr. Jupiter’s offer in order to pursue his own career and attend college, but Kid Flash, Wonder Girl, Speedy, Hawk, and Dove, together with Lilith, become students in the new program, forsaking their costumes and super-powers for the duration.

Notes:
>> First appearance of Lilith Clay; becomes a Teen Titan this issue
>> First appearance of Loren Jupiter
>> First and only appearance of Arthur Swenson.
>> Hawk and Dove join the Titans.
>> Robin takes a leave of absense with this issue.


Teen Titans #26 [1970]
cover date: March-April 1970

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Robert Kanigher
Penciler, inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: John Costanza
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis:
After training in Mr. Jupiter’s survival course (located on the secret 13th floor of a city skyscraper), the former Titans are assigned to a field exercise: to survive in “Hell’s Corner,” a tough inner-city neighborhood, with only a penny apiece to their names. Menaced by the Hell’s Hawks street gang and unable to fight back without abandoning their new pacifist beliefs, the Titans are rescued by the intervention of Mal, a black youth. Taking jobs in Hell’s Corner, the Titans encounter Mal again at an amateur boxing event where he is matched against Storm Trooper, leader of the Hell’s Hawks, and wins. Mal is recruited by the Titans and joins Mr. Jupiter’s program, but feeling unworthy, tries to prove himself by stowing away aboard an experimental rocket flight.

Notes:
>> First appearance of Malcolm “Mal” Duncan (formal first name revealed in issue #44, last name revealed in issue #45; known only as “Mal”; joins the Teen Titans in this story).
>> First appearance of Cindy Duncan, Mal’s younger sister.
>> Mal joins Mr. Jupiter’s training program and learns the Teen Titans’ secret identities in this story.


Teen Titans #27 [1970]
cover date: May-June 1970

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Robert Kanigher
Pencilers: George Tuska (pages 1, 14-18, 22-23) and Carmine Infantino (pages 2-13, 19-21)
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Ben Oda
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: The other Titans undertake a space flight to retrieve Mal. While Dove circles in the command module, Speedy, Hawk, and Wonder Girl discover the equipment left behind by the Apollo 11 flight missing from the moon, and Kid Flash and Lilith rendezvous with Mal in the Venus Probe. After making friendly contact with telepathic aliens who have moved the lunar souvenirs, the Titans on the moon are rejoined by their teammates, who have recovered Mal. The Titans overcome hallucinations caused by a malfunctioning oxygen intake system, and return to Earth.

Notes:
>> Final appearance of Cindy Duncan to date; mistakenly colored as a Caucasian in this story.


Teen Titans #28 [1970]
cover date: July-August 1970

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Steve Skeates
Penciler, inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Ben Oda
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: Aqualad, unaware of the Teen Titans’ new connection with Mr. Jupiter, returns to the surface world in search of his teammates and finds Titan Lair deserted. He tries to find Wonder Girl at the apartment she shares with Sharon Tracy, but instead finds himself battling thugs who are after Sharon because of something she accidentally witnessed in the park, but which she cannot remember due to selective amnesia. Leaving her in the safety of the former Titans HQ, Aqualad locates Robin at Hudson University, and is taken to the other Titans at Mr. Jupiter’s estate, only to find them unwilling to become involved due to their pacifist vow. The Titans redon their costumes long enough for Lilith to use her telepathy to learn that Sharon had witnessed the transformation of a henchman of Ocean Master, Aquaman’s arch-enemy, into an alien being. Angered at his former comrades’ seeming apathy, Aqualad pursues the case alone, but is defeated by Ocean Master, bound, and left to die when the hour he can survive out of water is up.

Notes:
>> Robin appears (in between Detective Comics #401 and 402; returns from leave of absence for this issue only)
>> Aqualad appears (last seen in Aquaman #53; returns from leave of absence for this issue and next issue only)


Teen Titans #29 [1970]
cover date: Sept-Oct 1970

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Steve Skeates
Penciler, inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: John Costanza
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: Voting to forego their vow against using their powers and costumes for the duration of the present case, the Titans track down Aqualad in time to rescue him. Meanwhile, Hawk and Dove pursue a lead on their own, returning to Sharon Tracy’s apartment. When the thugs who had attacked Sharon earlier return, Dove recruits the other Titans to help out, but both Hawk and Dove are nevertheless captured by Ocean Master and held prisoner in his undersea headquarters. They discover an alliance between Ocean Master and invading aliens (as also revealed in Aquaman #50-52), and escape to battle them, but are saved from defeat only by the other Titans, who trail them to Ocean Master’s hideaway, and overcome the invaders. The Titans agree to redon their costumes only in cases of extreme emergency, and Aqualad, reconciled with his teammates, returns to Atlantis.

Notes:
>> Speedy appears next in Detective Comics #402, in which he visits with Robin at Hudson University following this story.
>> Aqualad returns to leave of absence status after the events of this story; appears next in the second story in next issue.
>> Hawk and Dove both take leaves of absence after the events of this story; both appear next in the second story in issue #31.


Teen Titans #30 [1970]
cover date: Nov-Dec 1970

Credits:
FIRST STORY: “Greed… Kills!” (13 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Steve Skeates
Penciler, inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: John Costanza
SECOND STORY: “Whirlwind” (2 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Steve Skeates
Penciler, inker: Sal Amendola
THIRD STORY: “Some Call It Noise” (9 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Steve Skeates
Penciler: Carmine Infantino
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Ben Oda
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis, First Story: The Titans are assigned by Mr. Jupiter to procure a charity donation from businessman Hargood P. Tout, but become sidetracked preventing a robbery. When one of the thieves, Kevin Murphy, is hospitalized after being accidentally hit by a car while making his getaway, the Titans help police protect him from assassins. These killers prove to have been sent by Hargood Tout, who is revealed as Murphy’s former criminal partner. After Tout had used his ill-gotten gains to become a legitimate businessman, he had tried to have Murphy done away with to prevent him from revealing Tout’s shady past, but Murphy had faked his own death in order to foil his would-be assassins. Now revealed as being still alive, Murphy is again a target, until the Titans stop Tout’s hirelings and have Tout jailed.

Synopsis, Second Story: Returning to his home town of Blue Valley, Kid Flash is forced to resume his costumed identity to stop a masked bank robber possessing a device which allows him to control a man-sized tornado. The device malfunctions as a result of Kid Flash’s battle with the villain, and the tornado blows the criminal out to sea, where he presumably drowns, his true identity still a mystery.

Synopsis, Third Story: Aqualad and Aquagirl come ashore to enjoy part of an outdoor rock concert in a small coastal town. Meanwhile, a hospital patient becomes a berserk marauder due to an injection of an experimental synthetic hormone, escapes the hospital, and menaces the audience at the nearby concert. Aqualad overcomes him, but not before Aquagirl is injured and wanders inland in a daze. Aqualad barely manages to find her and return both of them to the sea before they die, having been on land beyond their one-hour time limit.

Notes:
>> none


Teen Titans #31 [1971]
cover date: Jan-Feb 1971

Credits:
FIRST STORY: “To Order Is To Destroy” (15 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Steve Skeates
Penciler: George Tuska
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: John Costanza
SECOND STORY: “From One To Twenty” (7 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Steve Skeates
Penciler: George Tuska
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Joe Letterese
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis, First Story: Visiting the campus of Elford University with his grandfather, Prof. West, Kid Flash intervenes to help a lone student being waylaid by a mob of fellow students. He discovers that, in an insane scheme to do away with student unrest and riots, a fraudulent college psychologist has been performing operations on students, attaching a computer circuit to their brain, turning them into mindless drones. The Teen Titans investigate, and with the aid of the student Kid Flash helped earlier, put a stop to the psychologist’s mad plan and return the students to normal.

Synopsis, Second Story: Having departed the Titans’ rank to return totheir home town, Hawk and Dove combine brawn and brains to uncover and halt a counterfieting scheme.

Notes:
>> Hawk and Dove appear next in Teen Titans #50 as members of Titans West.


Teen Titans #32 [1971]
cover date: March-April 1971

Credits:
Editors, plotters: Murray Boltinoff and Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Steve Skeates
Penciler, inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Joe Letterese
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: An experiment of Mr. Jupiter’s in time travel explodes, hurling Mal into prehistoric times, and Kid Flash travels into the past to save him. While there, the two accidentally cause the death of a caveman, which changes history, and they return to a weirdly warped present, in which they are menaced by medieval counterparts of Mr. Jupiter, their fellow Titans, and the Justice League members.

Notes:
>> First appearance of Gnarrk (named in issue #33)
>> Gnarrk’s history is completely negated by the events of Crisis on Infinite Earths; His post-Crisis history is detailed in New Titans #56 [1989].
>> The story for this issue was approved by former editor Dick Giordano and edited by new editor Murray Boltinoff.


Teen Titans #33 [1971]
cover date: May-June 1971

Credits:
Editors, plotters: Murray Boltinoff and Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: George Tuska
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Ben Oda
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis:
Kid Flash and Mal escape the alternate Earth of Jupiterius and return to the prehistoric past, this time preventing the death of the caveman whose demise had warped history. However, they accidentally bring the caveman back to modern times with them. Mr. Jupiter gives the Titans the task of training Gnarrk, as the Cro-Magnon is christened, to become a civilized present-day man. Robin returns to the ranks to help out, only to find that Gnarrk’s education has taken on an added importance: the caveman has witnessed a payoff between underworld figures and a respected city councilman, and must be trained quickly to become a believable witness in court.

When gangsters attempt to assassinate Gnarrk, Lilith, with whom he is slowly falling in love, takes him to a supposed place of safety, but the hoods find them and attack. Lilith is wounded, and Gnarrk goes berserk, easily overcoming the hired killers. Robin and the Titans intervene in time to stop him from committing murder, and Gnarrk agrees to abide by present-day law and refrain from killing in revenge. Lilith recovers, and Gnarrk’s testimony results in the conviction of the crooked councilman.

Notes:
>> Gnarrk adopts the name “John Gnarrk”; appears next in issue #39.
>> Gnarrk becomes a part-time member of the Teen Titans, learns the Teen Titans’ secret identities, and begins a romance with Lilith in this story.
>> Gnarrk’s history is completely negated by the events of Crisis on Infinite Earths; His post-Crisis history is detailed in New Titans #56 [1989].
>> Robin returns from leave of absence as of this story.
>> The story in this issue was approved by former editor Dick Giordano and edited by Murray Boltinoff.
>> The Teen Titans team up with Batman in The Brave and the Bold #94 following this story.


Teen Titans #34 [1971]
cover date: July-August 1971

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Murray Boltinoff
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: George Tuska
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: John Costanxa
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: The Titans investigate spooky goings-on on Dog Island, where Donna (Wonder Girl) Troy has been looking after an elderly lady, Miss Wickersham. Through Lilith’s mental powers, they learn that Miss Wickersham is actually an ancient witch whose spirit is slowly possessing Donna, who resembles the witch as she looked in her youth. The Titans must deal with the Jukes brothers, superstitious inhabitants of the island who believeWonder Girl is a demoness due to her super-strength, and must prevent the unwitting Wonder Girl’s total possession before Miss Wickersham finally dies and is reunited with the spirit of her murdered lover.

Notes:
>> Kid Flash does not appear in this story.
>> The Teen Titans team up with Superman in World’s Finest Comics #205 following this story.


Teen Titans #35 [1971]
cover date: Sept-Oct 1971

Credits:
FIRST STORY: “Intruders of the Forbidden Crypt” (15 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Murray Boltinoff
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: George Tuska
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: John Costanxa

SECOND STORY: “A Titan Is Born” (7 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Murray Boltinoff
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: George Tuska
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: John Costanxa
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis, First Story: In Verona for the opening of Mr. Jupiter’s new laboratory complex, the Titans and their mentor become involved in a feud with the Della Loggia family, who oppose the building of the new project. At the same time, Lilith becomes convinced she is the reincarnation of the Shakespearean heroine, Juliet, and becomes romantically involved with Romeo Della Loggia. After the conflict erupts into violence, Mr. Jupiter and the other Titans trail the missing young lovers to a hidden crypt.

Synopsis, Second Story: While the rest of the team is in Italy, Mal minds the store at Mr. Jupiter’s American base. A dimensional monitoring experiment goes awry, and the Titans’ old enemy, the Gargoyle, is released from his banishment in Limbo. Mal manages to deduce the villain’s true identity, though he is disguised as a scientific colleague of Mr. Jupiter’s, and causes the computer monitor to reverse its error, returning Gargoyle to his exile in Limbo.

FIRST REPRINTED STORY: ”The Doom Hunters” (from World’s Finest Comics #139) (10 Pages) Comments This is an Aquaman story Aqualad’s hair is recolored black (brown in original printing).

SECOND REPRINTED STORY: ”Have Arrow – Will Travel” (from Adventure Comics #263) (6 Pages) Comments This is a Green Arrow story featuring Speedy. This issue is a 48-page giant.

Notes:
>> The Gargoyle, last seen in issue #14, is disguised as Dr. Viktor Heller in this story; The Gargoyle is later revealed to be a transformed Bromwell Stick [Mr. Twister]; Gargoyle and Mr. Twister revealed as the same entity in Secret Origins Annual #3 [1989].


Teen Titans #36 [1971]
cover date: Nov-Dec 1971

Credits:
FIRST STORY: “The Tomb Be Their Destiny” (15 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Murray Boltinoff
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: George Tuska
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: John Costanxa

SECOND STORY: “The Girl of the Shadows” (3 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Dick Giordano
Plotter, scripter: Steve Skeates
Penciler, inker, letterer: Jim Aparo

THIRD STORY: “The Teenager from Nowhere” (7 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Murray Boltinoff
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler, inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Ben Oda
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis, First Story: In the secret crypt of the Capulet family, the Titans discover the existence of an unsuspected player in Shakespeare’s drama: Calibano, a hunchback who adored Juliet and dueled Romeo for her favor, and who had been preserved in suspended animation when he allowed himself to be buried alive in the lovers’ tomb. While Robin and Mr. Jupiter find proof of a smuggling operation being masterminded by the present-day Calibano, a nephew of the Della Loggia family who had promoted their feud with Mr. Jupiter, the remaining Titans intervene in the struggle between Romeo and the original Calibano. Both Calibanos perish, and the Della Loggia clan calls off its feud with the Titans’ mentor.

Synopsis, Second Story: Aqualad aids an exotically beautiful mystery girl against a seemingly extradimensional enemy, but both vanish before he can learn their true identities or the reason for the conflict. This plotline and the identities of the new characters are never resolved.

Synopsis, Third Story: As a youngster, Lilith first suspects her possession of special powers when she is able to locate a lost child. Further utilizing her strange gift, she reads her parents’ minds and learns that she is actually an adopted orphan. Returning to the orphanage, she learns that her telepathy is a inherited trait from her mother, and that her true parents may still be alive, resolving to one day search out her real identity.

FIRST REPRINTED STORY ”Superboy Meets Robin the Boy Wonder” (from Adventure Comics #253) (13 Pages)

Notes:
>> The subplot of the romance between Lilith and Romeo Della Loggia in this story and previous issue is never resolved.
>> The Aqualad story was inventoried since Dick Giordano’s editorship. This plotline and the identities of the new characters are never resolved.
>> Some details of Lilith’s origin and her adoptive surname, Clay, are revealed; next chronological appearance in the Lilith story in issue #38. This is the first in a series of Lilith solo stories. This story takes place when Lilith is not quite 13 years old, and continues in future Lilith stories.
>> First appearance of Mr. and Mrs Will Clay.


Teen Titans #37 [1972]
cover date: Jan-Feb 1972

Credits:
FIRST STORY “Scourge of the Skeletal Riders” (25 Pages) Editor, plotter: Murray Boltinoff
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: George Tuska
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Joe Letterese

FIRST REPRINTED STORY:
“Superboy Meets the Young Green Arrow”
(from Adventure Comics #258) (13 Pages)

Synopsis: The Teen Titans travel to Ranistan, a foreign land torn by civil war, to rescue an old friend, newsreel cameraman Grady Dawes, who is missing and presumed dead while covering the conflict for the media. Again and again, they find their efforts thwarted by mysterious figures resembling the Biblical Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. Finally, Death (in the form of the final Horseman) claims Grady Dawes, while the Titans are occupied saving a young Ranistanian mother and child from his fatal scythe.

FIRST REPRINTED STORY: ”Superboy Meets the Young Green Arrow” (from Adventure Comics #258) (13 Pages)
This is a Superboy story. Green Arrow’s costume and hair (as a young boy and as an adult) mistakenly recolored to resemble Speedy’s (correct green and blond colors in original printing).

Notes:
>> This story makes references to several untold Teen Titans adventures in which Grady Dawes took part.
>> Wonder Girl wears a long-sleeved version of her costume in this story.


Teen Titans #38 [1972]
cover date: Mar-April 1972

Credits:
Cover Artist: Nick Cardy
Cover Letterer: Gaspar Saladino

FIRST STORY “Through These Doors Pass the Bravest Titans of Them All” (18 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Murray Boltinoff
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: George Tuska
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Ben Oda

SECOND STORY “Nameless, Wander I” (7 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Murray Boltinoff
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: George Tuska
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Joe Letterese

Synopsis, First Story: Reading her teammates’ minds, Lilith unintentionally uncovers the secret subconscious fears of Robin, Mal, and Wonder Girl. She and Mr. Jupiter concoct a plan by which the three Titans are forced to confront their fears in the form of hallucinatory dream-adventures. Mal conquers his agoraphobia, a fear of open spaces originating from a time when he was beaten by a street gang after being caught in an open lot, during an imaginary space mission. Wonder Girl overcomes her fear of being thought un-feminine due to her Amazon strength when she is forced to shave her head and disguise herself as a man during an espionage caper. Robin comes to grips with his fear of failure when he is able to admit having been unable to rescue a drowning pilot. gun and Riva is accidentally killed in the ensuing struggle.

Synopsis, Second Story: Leaving home to find her real parents, Lilith joins a traveling carnival as a mentalist, where she is tricked into believing that Jack Horn, the carnival owner, and his wife, Riva, are her stepfather and stepmother. When she discovers she has been duped and tries to leave, Horn pulls a gun and Riva is accidentally killed in the ensuing struggle.

FIRST REPRINTED STORY: ”Green Arrow’s New Partner” (from Adventure Comics #260) (6 Pages)
Comment: This is a Green Arrow story.

SECOND REPRINTED STORY: ”Aqualad Goes to School” (from Adventure Comics #278) (7 Pages)
Comments: This is an Aquaman story, with its logo relettered to feature Aqualad.

Notes:
>> Wonder Girl uses the cover name “Donna Drake” in her hallucinatory adventure.
>> Kid Flash and Lilith help Robin in Batman #241-242 following this story.


Teen Titans #39 [1972]
cover date: May-June 1972

Credits:
FIRST STORY “Awake Barbaric Titan” (22 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Murray Boltinoff
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: George Tuska
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Joe Letterese
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

FIRST REPRINTED STORY “After the Cat”
“After the Cat” (from The Hawk and the Dove #3)
(from The Hawk and the Dove #3) (13 Pages)

Synopsis: Gnarrk loses his job at the Forbes Foundation, a social research institution, when his past as a rehabilitated Cro-Magnon man becomes known. Then Gnarrk runs wild, smashing an Aztec Indian tribe, and finally menacing even Lilith, until the sound of her voice brings him back to his senses. Freed by the Aztecs, who now recognize Gnarrk as a superior warrior, the Titans discover that a group of bank bandits have become victims of a poisoned stream, and return their bodies and loot to civilization, while keeping secret the hidden native tribe’s existence.

FIRST REPRINTED STORY: ”After the Cat” (from The Hawk and the Dove #3) (from The Hawk and the Dove #3) (13 Pages)
Comments This is a Hawk and Dove story, with one page added (scripter: Steve Skeates; penciler, inker: Sal Amendola; letterer: John Costanza) explaining their origin.

Notes:
>> The romance between Gnarrk and Lilith resumes in this story.
>> Wonder Girl is mistakenly called “Donna Drake” in this story
>> The Teen Titans team up with Batman in The Brave and the Bold #102 following this story.


Teen Titans #40 [1972]
cover date: July-Aug 1972

Credits:
“The Spawn of the Sinister Sea” (24 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Murray Boltinoff
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: Art Saaf
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Ben Oda
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: In Scotland, the Teen Titans halt a scheme to use a fake “Loch Ness Monster” to rob fishermen, but are mystified when Robin and Mal are attacked by persons unknown while exploring underwater. Duncan Gillkrankie, an old fisherman whose boat Mr. Jupiter has hired, identifies their attackers as thralls of Black Moray, an ancient sorcerer whose legendary castle is said to exist sunken at the bottom of the loch. Gillkrankie is almost immediately attacked and drowned by the same mystery duo,

When Robin learns that Aqualad is currently attending school nearby, he suspects their former teammate and his new girlfriend, Nirka McDuff, may be Black Moray’s servants. Their suspicions verified, the Titans hold Aqualad captive, but he is soon freed by Nirka, who is revealed as Black Moray’s sorceress daughter, and who has Aqualad under an enchantment. The Titans manage to recapture and hold Aqualad while Black Moray’s restored castle, together with the wizard and his daughter, sinks beneath the waves for another century. Aqualad loses all memory of what has happened.

Notes:
>> Lilith does not appear in this story


Teen Titans #41 [1972]
cover date: Sept-Oct 1972

Credits:
FIRST STORY
“What Lies in Litchburg Graveyard?” (17 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Murray Boltinoff
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: Art Saaf
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Joe Letterese

SECOND STORY
“Her Brother’s Keeper” (7 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Murray Boltinoff
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: Bob Brown
Inker: Dave Coekrum
Letterer: John Costanza
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis, First Story: Mr. Jupiter and the Titans are present at the deathbed of Jupiter’s black adoptive aunt, who presents Mal with an ancient voodoo fetish, the Moojum doll, as she dies. Over the next few nights, Mal, who bears a resemblance to Ned Jackson, Jupiter’s aunt’s father and a former slave in pre-Civil War times, finds he is being haunted and pursued by the ghosts of slave-dealer Ahab Barstow and his hunting hounds. Despite the Titans’ efforts in his behalf, Mal is saved from the spirit-beings only when the Moojum doll comes to life as his giant protector and destroys the phantoms forever.

Synopsis, Second Story: Still traveling in search of her true parents, Lilith joins forces with Ned, an amnesiac boy with similar mental powers whom she suspects could be her brother. When she is finally able to overcome the mental block created by his amnesia which prevents her from reading his mind, Lilith learns that the two are not related after all, but is able to reunite the boy with his parents.

Notes:
>> Kid Flash (mistakenly depicted on cover) and Lilith do not appear in the first story


Teen Titans #42 [1972]
cover date: Nov-Dec 1972

Credits:
“Slaves of the Emperor Bug” (22 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Murray Boltinoff
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: Art Saaf
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Milton Snapinn
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis: Wonder Girl acquires a mysterious beetle-shaped brooch, which comes to life and claims to be a transformed golden warrior, doomed to this form by a mystical enemy since ancient times. She and Lilith convince the skeptical male Titans to come to Yucatan on a quest to restore the beetle’s true shape, but when the others are endangered, Wonder Girl leaves to pursue her goal alone. The other Titans locate her in time to save her from death by snakebite, but then the entire team is taken captive in a hidden cavern by Johnny Carpetbag, a hobo who is actually a servant of the beetle-entity. The revived “beetle” proves to be a gigantic bug-creature, not a handsome humanoid warrior as it had claimed, and Wonder Girl, with the help of the beetle-god’s revived enemy, Mordron, is barely able to free her teammates before the entire cavern is destroyed in the battle between the two sorceress creatures.

Notes:
>> none


Teen Titans #43 [1973]
cover date: Jan-Feb 1973

Credits:
FIRST STORY
“Inherit the Howling Night” (16 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Murray Boltinoff
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler: Art Saaf
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Ben Oda

SECOND STORY “Please Tell Me My Name” (8 Pages)
Editor, plotter: Murray Boltinoff
Plotter, scripter: Bob Haney
Penciler, inker: Ernie Chan
Letterer: Joe Letterese
Cover Art: Nick Cardy

Synopsis, First Story: Cyrus Manning, an old man, and his young grandson, Davey, are menaced in their home by demons known as Moonlings, until the Teen Titans penetrate a mystic barrier around the house to aid them. The Titans come out second-best to the demons in a subsequent series of attacks, until the ghost of Davey’s mother appears, to reveal that the child is actually a changeling substituted for the real Davey (who died as an infant) by witches, and thus is a focal point for the Moonlings’ attacks. Cyrus Manning kills the bogus child, and the demons vanish.

Synopsis, Second Story: Continuing her search for her true identity, Lilith befriends spiritualist and convicted murderess Lily Dunbar, whom she suspects may be her mother. Using her mental powers, she attains a stay of execution from the governor, and is able to prove that the actual murderer was Lily’s ex-partner, Ben Tatum. Once freed, however, Lily finds her real daughter, and Lilith is again stymied in her quest.

Notes:
>> Never matching the popularity of their counterparts in Justice League of America, the Teen Titans’ title remained a bimonthly comic throughout its run, and was finally canceled with issue #43. Almost four years later, Teen Titans was revived with issue #44, November 1976, although less than two years had passed in the lives of the members during the hiatus.
>> Robin appears next in Batman #246
>> Kid Flash appears next in The Flash #220
>> Wonder Girl appears next in issue #44
>> Speedy appears next in Green Lantern (second series) #85-86, where he is revealed as a heroin addict
>> Lilith appears next in issue #50


Teen Titans #44 [1976]
cover date: November 1976

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Joe Orlando
Plotters, scripters: Paul Levitz and Bob Rozakis
Penciler: Pablo Marcos
Inker: Bob Smith
Letterer: Ben Oda
Colorist: Jerry Serpe
Cover art: Ernie Chan (penciler) and Vince Colletta (inker)

Synopsis: After a two-year hiatus, during which Mr. Jupiter has closed down his training program and Mal has been left in charge of the Teen Titans base and equipment while the team formally broke up so that its super-hero members could pursue their individual careers, the members receive an emergency signal which rallies Robin, Kid flash, Wonder Girl, Speedy, and Mal to their former headquarters. This turns out to be a trap set by Dr. Light, who intends to use the Titans as bait to trap the Justice League. He defeats the team in battle and captures Robin and Wonder Girl, then stops Kid flash and Speedy before they can warn their adult counterparts of his plans. Mal appropriates an exo-skeleton (used against Robin in Batman #192) and the Guardian’s costume (left in the keeping of Speedy, who is revealed as the Guardian’s nephew in Superman Family #191-194) from the Titans’ storeroom to become the new Guardian, in which identity he is able to free his captive fellow members. Together, the revived Titans defeat Dr. Light and stop his plan to take over the JLA satellite.

Notes:
>> Never matching the popularity of their counterparts in Justice League of America, the Teen Titans’ title remained a bimonthly comic throughout its run, and was finally canceled with issue #43. Almost four years later, Teen Titans was revived with issue #44, November 1976, although less than two years had passed in the lives of the members during the hiatus.
>> Robin was last seen in Batman #279
>> Kid Flash was last seen in The Flash #240
>> Wonder Girl was last seen in issue #43
>> Mal becomes the Guardian (II) in this story, later negated after Crisis.
>> Speedy was last seen, as Roy Harper, in Action Comics #436; gets new costume as of this story and resumes romance with Wonder Girl
>> Green Lantern #85-86 [1971] takes place between Teen Titans #43 and #44. In that story, Speedy becomes hooked on heroin; While a disbelieving Green Arrow was stunned into inaction, Roy overcame his addiction with the aid of Green Lantern and Black Canary, and thereupon severed relations with the Emerald Archer to go out on his own.
top of index


Teen Titans #45 [1976]
cover date: December 1976

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Julius Schwartz
Plotter, scripter: Bob Rozakis
Penciler: lrv Novick
Inker: Vince Colletta
Letterer: Ben Oda
Cover art: Ernie Chan (penciler) and Vince Colletta (inker)

Synopsis: Neighborhood gang leader Steve “the Wrecker” Macchione returns home after being dishonorably discharged from the military to find his old neighborhood being torn down to make way for a high-rise apartment complex, and reorganizes his former gang, the Wreckers, to stop the project. Mal, after an argument with the other Titans, is caught in a blast set by the Wreckers and finds himself in a contest for his very life with Azrael, the Angel of Death. He believes this to have been a mere hallucination until he awakens to find himself in possession of a mystic horn given him by the angel Gabriel. According to Azrael, by defeating him Mal has won the right to life, but if he should lose a fight – to anyone – he must die. Gabriel’s horn, when blown, gives him unspecified powers to use whenever the odds are against him in battle. He summons the Titans, including Aqualad, who split up to deal with the Wreckers’ bombings. Robin, Kid Flash, and Aqualad save the Wayne Foundation building from destruction, then join Speedy, Wonder Girl, and Mal to finish off the Wreckers. Malls reconciled with the team, and joins Roy (Speedy) Harper’s rock band, Great Frog, as well, while Bruce (Batman) Wayne agrees to finance a new Teen Titans headquarters.

Notes:
>> .Aqualad – last seen in Aquaman #63 – rejoins the Teen Titans
>> First appearance of Karen Beecher, Mal’s girlfriend.
>> First appearance of Gabriel’s Horn headquarters/nightclub.
>> Mal receives Gabriel Horn and becomes Hornblower.
>> Aqualad rejoins, and the Teen Titans agree to Robin’s suggestion of building their new headquarters under a Long Island discotheque, which they soon name “Gabriel’s Horn;” The establishment is funded by Bruce “Batman” Wayne.


Teen Titans #46 [1977]
cover date: February 1977

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Julius Schwartz
Plotter, scripter: Bob Rozakis
Penciler: Irv Novick
Inker: Joe Giella
Cover art: Rich Buckler (penciler) and Frank McLaughlin (inker)

Synopsis: The Fiddler, having left the ranks of Earth-2′s Injustice Society, wreaks havoc at the scene of an Earth-1 rock concert, and tangles with Mal and Speedy, while at Titans HQ, Robin proposes his recent antagonist, the Joker’s Daughter, for membership. Meanwhile, promoter Bernie Michaels sponsors a “Battle of the Bands” concert featuring Peter McCarthy and the Flyers with the Woodworkers, although the two groups profess antagonism to each other while never having met. When the Fiddler appears to have kidnapped both groups, the Titans, with the aid of the Joker’s Daughter, battle and capture him, only to discover that the Flyers and the Woodworkers have always secretly been the same people in different guises and had arranged their own seeming abduction to avoid having to appear in both identities simultaneously.

Notes:
>> This story continues a thread from Batman Family #9 [1977]: A plaque is stolen and the thief’s identity is a mystery. Robin and Batgirl run into the Joker’s Daughter, posing as criminal offspring of the the Scarecrow, the Riddler and even the Penguin; During a scuffle, Joker’s Daughter unmasks Robin, thus revealing his identity to her. Robin and Batgirl discover the plaque was stolen by a political radical, not Joker’s Daughter. Robin informs Joker’s Daughter he has deduced she is really Duela Dent, daughter of Two-Face. Later, Duela tells Dick Grayson Two-Face hated her because he wanted twins. She confesses to Robin she wants to be a super-heroine to make up for her father’s evil. She created her ‘malicious mischief’ to show she had the skills and abilities to become a Teen Titan – and she wants Robin to nominate her for membership!
>> Duela Dent [Joker's Daughter] joins the Teen Titans
>> Mal appears as the Hornblower in this story


Teen Titans #47 [1977]
cover date: April 1977

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Julius Schwartz
Plotter, scripter: Bob Rozakis
Cover art: Rich Buckler (penciler) and Jack Abel (inker)

Synopsis: Twin teams of criminals strike in the “twin” cities of New York and Gotham: on the first team, Flamesplasher has fire powers, Darklight can create darkness, and Sizematic grows to giant size, while their counterparts have water, light, and shrinking powers, respectively. The Joker’s Daughter is suspected of duplicity when she receives telepathic “hunches” leading the Teen Titans to the criminals, but then contributes to the heroes’ defeat by confusing the powers of one super-villain trio with the other. Finally, the Titans are able to defeat both gangs by turning their powers against each other, but not before Robin and the Joker’s Daughter are captured by the mastermind behind the two villainous groups, Two-Face.

Notes:
>> none


Teen Titans #48 [1977]
cover date: June 1977

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Julius Schwartz
Plotter, scripter: Bob Rozalds
Penciler: Jose Delbo
Inker: Vince Colletta
Letterer: Milton Snapinn
Colorist: Jerry Serpe
Cover art: Rich Buckler (penciler) and Jack Abel (inker)

Synopsis: Robin and the Joker’s Daughter escape from Two-Face and warn the other Titans of his plan to blow up both New York and Gotham City. They are delayed by an altercation with the Bumblebee, actually Mal’s girlfriend Karen Beecher in a new costumed identity, but Kid Flash and Mal nevertheless join Robin in time to save New York, while Wonder Girl and Speedy team with the Joker’s Daughter to safeguard Gotham City. Two-Face is reunited with his “daughter” and learns of her crimefighting identity, while Duela takes on a new role as the Harlequin, and Aqualad appears near death after unexplained spells of weakness and unconsciousness during the preceding case.

Notes:
>> First appearance of Karen Beecher as Bumblebee.
>> Duela Dent assumes the new costume identity of Harlequin this issue


Teen Titans #49 [1977]
cover date: August 1977

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Julius Schwartz
Plotter, scripter: Bob Rozalds
Penciler: Jose Delbo
Inker: Vince Colletta
Letterer: Milton Snapinn
Colorist: Jerry Serpe
Cover art: Rich Buckler (penciler) and Jack Abel (inker)

Synopsis: After much preparation (during the previous two cases), the Teen Titans (in their civilian identities) open a restaurant/discotheque, Gabriel’s Horn, as a “cover” for their new secret headquarters, only to have their opening night festivities invaded by the Rocket-Rollers, a criminal gang using specially powered skateboards. When the Rollers make a second appearance, the Titans are able to stop them with the help of new members Harlequin and Bumblebee, Mal in his new costumed role as the Hornblower and a revived Aqualad. Immediately afterward, however Aqualad falls ill once more, and Mal, his mystic horn having vanished, returns to his identity as the Guardian, claiming he is doing so to protect his true identity, since it is known that Mal Duncan and Hornblower are one and the same.

Notes:
>> Great Frog was last seen in Action Comics #436; a rock group organized by Roy Harper, of which Mal Duncan becomes a member; appears next, without Mal, in Green Lantern (second series) #100
>> Gabriel’s Horn is officially introduced in this story. Robin and Batgirl visit Gabriel’s Horn and Teen Titans’ headquarters in Batman Family #13 sometime before the events of the next issue.
>> Bumblebee joins the team
>> Mal gets a new costume as Hornblower (designed by Dave Elyea), but becomes the Guardian again in this story
>> The subplot involving Mal’s missing Gabriel Horn is never resolved


Teen Titans #50 [1977]
cover date: October 1977

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Julius Schwartz
Plotter, scripter: Bob Rozalds
Penciler: Don Heck
Inker: Joe Giella
Letterer: Milton Snapinn
Colorist: Jerry Serpe
Cover art: Rich Buckler (penciler) and Jack Abel (inker)

Synopsis: Robin, Kid Flash, Wonder Girl, and Harlequin encounter a new super-villain, Captain Calamity, and his gang when they rob passengers on the Long Island Railroad. Meanwhile, on the West Coast, Lilith recruits other teen heroes, including Bat-Girl, Beast Boy, Golden Eagle, and the Hawk and the Dove to combat a series of mysterious disasters. Then Robin, Harlequin, Speedy, Guardian, and Bumblebee are stymied in a second battle with Captain Calamity.

Notes:
>> First appearance of Titans West
>> First appearance of Beast Boy, Bat-Girl [Bette Kane] and Golden Eagle as Titans
>> The events of this story are retold – with revisions – in SECRET ORIGINS ANNUAL #3 [1989]
>> First appearance of Captain Calamity
>> Bat-Girl (Betty Kane; niece of Kathy (Batwoman) Kane, and not to be confused with Batgirl (Barbara Gordon); last seen in Detective Comics #322; now a professional tennis player)
>> Beast Boy (last seen in Doom Patrol #120; now an actor on the TV series Space Trek: 2022; his secret identity revealed to the world as of this story)
>> Golden Eagle (Charley Parker; last seen in Justice League of America #117; name misspelled Charlie in this story)


Teen Titans #51 [1977]
cover date: November 1977

Credits:
Editors, plotters: Jack C. Harris and Julius Schwartz
Plotter, scripter: Bob Rozalds
Penciler: Don Heck
Inker: Frank Chiaramonte
Letterer: Milton Snapinn
Colorist: Jerry Serpe
Cover art: Rich Buckler (penciler) and Jack Abel (inker)

Synopsis:
Lilith and her “Titans West” group, including Gnarrk, rescue victims of more incredible disasters, and discover a connection between these events and the crimes of Captain Calamity on the East Coast. Robin and the Titans’ “first team” defeat Captain Calamity’s henchmen, and Kid Flash and Wonder Girl rejoin their teammates just in time to hear Aqualad announce his resignation: he has diagnosed his “fainting spells” as a psychosomatic illness brought on by his feelings of inferiority and uselessness to the land-based Titans team.

Notes:
>> The events of this story are retold – with revisions – in SECRET ORIGINS ANNUAL #3 [1989]
>> Aqualad leaves the team this issue; Continues to appear with Aquaman in Adventures Comics. In Adventure Comics #453-455 [1977-1878], Aqualad learns details of his origin for the first time.
>> Gnarrk (last seen in issue #39) and LilithÕs engagement revealed in this story
>> Teen Titans West is officially named in this story


Teen Titans #52 [1977]
cover date: December 1977

Credits:
Editors, plotters: Jack C. Harris and Julius Schwartz
Plotter, scripter: Bob Rozakis
Penciler: Don Heck
Inker: Bob Smith
Letterer: Milton Snapinn and Clem Robins (pages 2-8 only)
Colorist: Jerry Serpe
Cover art: Rich Buckler (penciler) and Jack Abel (inker)

Synopsis:
The two teams of Teen Titans join forces, but end up battling each other, until Wonder Girl’s magic lasso ends their disagreement, and Lilith reveals that Mr. Esper, a former foe of Batman, has been causing the uncanny happenings on both coasts by tapping her mental powers for his own use. The combined groups split up: Aqualad remains active to lead Kid flash, Golden Eagle, Beast Boy, Dove, and Bumblebee in an effort to prevent the Esper arranged disappearance of Long Island. Lilith commands the grouping of Wonder Girl, Speedy, Guardian, Hawk, and Gnarrk, who track down Mr. Esper himself. Robin, Bat-Girl, and Harlequin investigate the possible connection with Captain Calamity. When the “island-napping” is averted, but Mr. Esper mysteriously disappears, Robin’s team discovers that Esper and Captain Calamity are actually one and the same, and finally captures the villain.

Notes:
>> The events of this story are retold – with revisions – in SECRET ORIGINS ANNUAL #3 [1989]


Teen Titans #53 [1978]
cover date: Nov. 1976

Credits:
Editor, plotter: Jack C. Harris
Plotter, scripter: Bob Rozakis
Penciler: Juan Ortia
Inker: John Fuller
Letterer: Ben Oda
Colorist: Gene DeAngelo
Cover art: Rich Buckler (penciler) and Jack Abel (inker)

Synopsis: Looking through the Teen Titans Casebook, Guardian and Bumblebee review the heretofore untold origin of the Titans. When their adult counterparts suddenly turn to crime, Robin, Aqualad, Kid Flash, Speedy, and Wonder Girl – whom the others meet for the first time – converge on Metropolis to seek the aid of Superman, but then decide to team up and battle the Justice League-members-turned-evil by themselves. The original Titans trio of Robin, Kid Flash, and Aqualad defeats a rampaging Wonder Woman, while Speedy and Wonder Girl stop the Flash. Then Aquaman, Batman and Green Arrow are also captured by the young heroes. In JLA headquarters, they discover an alien energy-being, the Antithesis, who has warped the super-heroes in order to feed on the energies released by their criminal actions, but who fades away into nothingness when the last of his Justice League pawns is beaten. Inspired by the success of their teamwork, the five young heroes form a permanent organization, the Teen Titans, with Speedy as a part-time-only member. Even as Guardian and Bumblebee come to the close of the team’s first case, the other Titans arrive to announce the break-up of the group, in order that the members might again pursue their solo careers.

Notes:
>> Final issue of the series
>> The Teen Titans disband again in this story
>> In The Flash Spectacular 1978 [1978]: The Teen Titans (Robin, Aqualad, Wonder Girl, Speedy, Mal, and Harlequin) attend Wally (Kid Flash) West’s high-school graduation in their civilian identities. This story takes place after the events of Teen Titans #53.
>> The team reforms briefly in The Brave and the Bold #149 [1978] ; the series returns as New Teen Titans in DC Comics Presents #26 (preview insert) and New Teen Titans #1 [1980]
>> Duela Dent appears next in Batman Family #16 and #19; then in Detective Comics: #482-483 [1979]
>> Mal, Karen and Speedy appear next in Superman Family #191-194 [1978]: Mal (as Guardian), Karen (not as Bumblebee), and Speedy help Jimmy Olsen and the Newsboy Legion locate the Golden Guardian
>> Wonder Girl appears next in Adventure Comics #461 [1978] and Wonder Woman #265-266 [1980]
>> The origin of the Teen Titans is revealed in flashback as an Untold Tale from the Teen Titans Casebook: the story of how Robin, Kid Flash, Aqualad, Wonder Girl, and Speedy met and formally organized and named the Teen Titans team, between the events of The Brave and the Bold #54 and 60.
>> First appearance of Antithesis
>> First mention of Speedy as a founding member


Crossovers & Appearances: 1964-1980

IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

Adventure Comics #453-455 [1977-1878]: Aqualad Back-up Story. Aqualad barges into a meeting of the Idylist ruling council, demanding information about his parents. The council refuses to give Aqualad any information as they fear he may learn the truth. Soon after, Aqualad finds a banished Idylist hermit who admits to killing King Thar. Upon seeing a picture, Aqualad immediately recognizes Thar as his father. Aqualad breaks through security and accesses the ancient files to learn the truth: His parents were King Thar and Queen Berra, who ruled peacefully until King Thar went mad and became hungry for war. Thar’s peace loving people revolted, killing their once-beloved king and banished his now-pregnant wife. The Idylists, ashamed of the sins of this dark day, buried this information. Garth leaves knowing the truth and searches for Aquaman, who he had rebuffed earlier. First appearances (in flashback) of King Thar and Queen Berra.

Adventure Comics #461 [1978]: With the second disbanding of the Teen Titans, Donna Troy and Sharon Tracy moved to San Francisco, where Donna enrolled in Dr. Tammines’s School for Exceptional Girls, an experimental college which proved to be merely a front for the activities of Justice League nemesis Headmaster Mind, whose schemes Wonder Girl teamed with Wonder Woman to smash.

Batman #241-242 [1972]: Robin has a back-up solo story: Robin, Lilith and Kid Flash help a girl with psychic visions named Terri and discover a dangerous cult at Hudson University.

Batman Family #6 [1976]: Famous mystery novelist Christine Ariade passes away and in her will, stipulates that a vault be opened containing her ‘last mystery’. As the vault is opened, a colorful costumed young woman emerges, dressed as a female version of the Joker. Announcing herself as the Joker’s Daughter, she tells them she has stolen the manuscript. She bedevils Robin with prank gimmicks and eludes capture. Joker’s Daughter challenges Robin to a rendezvous at midnight, where the two tussle as Joker’s Daughter tells Robin “I stole nothing.” She escapes again and leaves Robin a toy with a warning “I’m going to be tracking down your identity.” Robin deduces the truth: novelist Christine Ariade couldnt write the ‘final’ story of her beloved character – her ‘last mystery’ was discovering there was no manuscript! First appearance of Duela Dent, Joker’s Daughter.

Batman Family #8 [1976]: Catgirl ['Catwoman's Daughter'] appears at Hudson University and vexes Robin. Catgirl’s presence incites the ire of Catwoman, who does not take well to copycats. Catgirl and Robin eventually team-up against Catwoman’s gang and Catgirl reveals herself as Joker’s Daughter in disguise!

Batman Family #9 [1977]: A plaque is stolen and the thief’s identity is a mystery. Robin and Batgirl run into the Joker’s Daughter, posing as criminal offspring of the the Scarecrow, the Riddler and even the Penguin; During a scuffle, Joker’s Daughter unmasks Robin, thus revealing his identity to her. Robin and Batgirl discover the plaque was stolen by a political radical, not Joker’s Daughter. Robin informs Joker’s Daughter he has deduced she is really Duela Dent, daughter of Two-Face. Later, Duela tells Dick Grayson Two-Face hated her because he wanted twins. She confesses to Robin she wants to be a super-heroine to make up for her father’s evil. She created her ‘malicious mischief’ to show she had the skills and abilities to become a Teen Titan – and she wants Robin to nominate her for membership! Continued in the pages of the Teen Titans #46.

Batman Family #16 [1978]: Robin, Batgirl, Harlequin and Bat-Girl [Bette Kane] thwart five criminals – and later learn they’ve been organized by a leader who’s plan is to discredit a politician.

Batman Family #19 [1978]: Dick Grayson runs into his former girlfriend, Lori Elton, who is with her new boyfriend, Dave Corby. As Dick tries to talk to Lori, she rebuffs him as her boyfriend Dave threatens Dick. As Lori and Dave depart, Dick is met by Duela Dent, who informs Dick she is leaving Hudson University because “there is… uh, something I must do.” She also warns Dick that Dave Corby is dangerous. Following that, Dick thwarts a robbery led by a mysterious costumed adversary calling himself The Raven. This storyline concludes in Detective #482-483.

Brave & The Bold #54 [1964]: The future Teen Titans make their first appearance as a team in this story, but the team is not officially organized or named. Robin, Kid Flash and Aqualad are asked by the teenagers of Hatton Corners to resolve a generation gap dispute; The young heroes defeat a villain called Mr. Twister. First unofficial appearance of the Teen Titans. First appearance of Mr. Twister.

Brave & The Bold #60 [1965]: The Teen Titans have been formally organized and named since the events of The Brave and the Bold #54. Now organized as the Teen Titans, Robin, Kid Flash, Aqualad, and Wonder Girl respond to a call for help from the teenagers of Midville. With the aid of the professor and the Midville teenagers, the Teen Titans are able to subdue the Separated Man. First ‘Donna Troy’ Wonder Girl. First official appearance of the Teen Titans.

The Brave and The Bold #83 [1969]: The four junior heroes team with Batman in the excellent “Punish Not My Evil Son!” Bruce Wayne gains another foster son, who proves to be an agent working to undermine Wayne Enterprises. Robin gets his Titans allies to help him in trying to expose the malefactor. The boy eventually has a last minute change of heart and dies in Batman’s arms, having taken a bullet for him.

The Brave and The Bold #94 [1971]: Batman tries to mediate between the Gotham Police and a youth organization called STOPP [Society to Outlaw Parental Power]. After Batman loses credibility over a misunderstanding wherein STOPP members are arrested, he calls upon the Teen Titans for help. Dick Grayson and Lilith Clay go undercover and infiltrate STOPP as Wonder Girl and Kid Flash aid on the outside, while Batman negociates with Gotham authorities. Batman eventually conveys amiable terms to STOPP and they are willing to stop their further agressions. One lone teen, Linda, refuses to release the location of a hidden bomb. Lilith is able to connect with Linda in a trance and reunite Linda with her estranged mother. Linda then reveals the bombs location and Batman and the Teen Titans are able to prevent it from detonating.

The Brave and The Bold #102 [1972]: A group of youths called the Young Aquarians mete out their own brand of vigilante justice in the Bayclayville section of Gotham. Feeling neglected and betrayed by Gotham, Bayclayville claimed the district as their own, even under the oppressive thumb of criminal Sonny Trask, about to be released from jail. Meanwhile, Gotham has targeted Bayclayville from demolition. Batman calls upon the Teen Titans – Robin, Wonder Girl, Kid Flash and Mal – to bridge the generation gap and save Bayclayville. The Teen Titans show the youths the meaning of civil disobedience when they lay in front of a bulldozer, forcing authorities to give them an extension date to clean up their district. Batman and the Teen Titans are able to help clean up Bayclayville – both from dirt and crime. Sonny Trask almost threatens Bayclayville’s rebirth, but he is stopped by his girlfriend, who finally takes a stand against him.

The Brave and the Bold #149 [1978]: The Teen Titans (Robin, Kid flash, Wonder Girl, and Speedy) are briefly reassembled to help Batman in a story on juvenile crime by Bob Haney and Jim Aparo. Batman enlists the Titans to go undercover and expose the leader of a chop shop. Donna Troy and Wally West go undercover, while Batman, Robin and Speedy provide back-up. The heroes eventually expose the leader, a local slum lord, and shut down his operations. This story takes place after the events of Teen Titans #53.

Brave & The Bold #181 [1979]: Both disillusioned with life in the present and its failure to live up to the expectations of either of their personal philosophies, Hank and Don are forced to change with the times when the Voice returns to strip them of their powers until such time as they prove worthy of them. This story is features out-of-continuity ‘older’ versions of characters. Next appearance in Tales of the Teen Titans #50.

DC Superstars [1976]: FIRST REPRINTED STORY “Monster Bait!” (from Teen Titans #11) SECOND REPRINTED STORY “Skis of Death” (from Teen Titans #24) FIRST FEATURETTE “Introducing the Teen Titans” (4 Pages).

Detective Comics: Batman Family #482-483 [1979]: A solo Robin back-up story. Robin battles the mysterious criminal organization known as MAZE. Robin encounters two operatives, the Raven and Card Queen. MAZE wants Robin out of the way for disrupting their operations. After Robin breaks up their operation, Raven attempts to flee but is stopped by the Card Queen, who is revealed to be Duela Dent working undercover. Robin exposes the Raven as Lori Elton’s boyfriend, Dave Corby, as she is left devasted by this news. Duela Dent’s only appearance as Card Queen. Last appearance until Tales of the Teen Titans #50.

The Doom Patrol #99 [1965]: Second Story: Doom Patrol headquarters is invaded by Gar Logan, a teenager with green skin and the ability to transform himself into any known animal. Dubbing him “Beast Boy,” the Doom Patrol grants his desire to join them on a mission, and he manages to save the day when the Patrol battles a gang of costumed looters. First appearance of Garfield Logan. Beast Boy (petitions to join the Doom Patrol in this story, and is accepted on a part-time provisional basis) First appearance of Jillian Jackson. Jillian “Jill” Jackson (formal first name revealed in issue #118; last name revealed in issue #119; appears next in issue #108).

The Doom Patrol #100 [1965]: First Story: While Beast Boy continues to petition for permanent membership in the Doom Patrol, his unscrupulous guardian, Nicholas Galtry, volunteers Gar Logan’s services to a mysterious Dr. Weir. Meanwhile, the police ask the aid of the Doom Patrol in dealing with marauding prehistoric creatures which have invaded the city. Suspecting the agency behind this fantastic threat, Beast Boy reveals his origin to the Chief. Beast Boy (mistakenly called “Craig” throughout this story; origin revealed; adopts Doom Patrol uniform and face-mask as of this story, thus keeping secret identity as Gar Logan; color of face-mask changes in subsequent stories).

The Doom Patrol #104 [1966]: After much soul-searching, Elasti-Girl finally agrees to marry Mento. She changes her mind, however, after a foiled ploy by Negative Man and Robotman to spoil the wedding proves to her how much her life with the Doom Patrol means to her. A heartsick Mento meanwhile consoles himself by redesigning his psychokinetic helmet and costume. Shortly thereafter, Mento appears to attack the Doom Patrol and to cause Rita to be temporarily blinded. An angry Robotman then retaliates by wrecking Steve Dayton’s mansion. Actually, both sides are being victimized by the Brotherhood of Evil, whose shape-changing member, Madame Rouge, had impersonated Mento in his “attack” on the Doom Patrol members. The Chief discovers their ruse in time to prevent an all-out war between Mento and the Patrol, but a recovered Elasti-Giri unwittingly spoils his plan to lure the Brotherhood into a trap. The heroes are on the edge of defeat when the Chief comes to the rescue in his Action Chair. The Brotherhood and Garguax retreat from a regrouped Doom Patrol, and Elasti-Girl accepts a new proposal from Mento. The wedding takes place at last a few hours later, with members of both the Justice League and the Teen Titans in attendance. Mento and Elasti-Girl marry in this story. Mento gets new costume and more powerful helmet in this story. The Teen Titans appear in this story in between Teen Titans #3 and 5.

The Doom Patrol #110 [1967]: The Brotherhood of Evil discovers the Doom Patrol to be still alive, and battles them once more. Meanwhile, the Chief deduces that the villains’ weaponry had been tampered with (as seen in the previous issue) by Madame Rouge, who is secretly infatuated with a member of the Patrol – actually, the Chief himself. With his “death” exposed as a hoax, Steve Dayton finds his legal case against Galtry for Beast Boy’s guardianship crumbling, especially after Mandred breaks free of his imprisonment in Doom Patrol headquarters and learns Beast Boy’s true identity as Gar Logan. The case is finally decided in Dayton’s favor, however, when Elasti-Girl disguises herself as Beast Boy to make it seem that Gar and Beast Boy are two different individuals. Gar Logan is taken from the custody of Nicholas Galtry and adopted by Steve and Rita Dayton as of this story. Madame Rouge is revealed to be in love with the Chief in this story, after hints in the last two issues.

The Doom Patrol #112-115 [1967]:The final back-up series began in Doom Patrol #112 (June, 1967), and highlighted the background of Beast Boy. Gar Logan’s past was fleshed out, as the events that led to his green skinned condition and how he was orphaned in the jungle at a very young age were detailed. He was taken under the wings of two opportunistic diamond thieves and then briefly served as a gorilla general in an anthropoid army run by another crazed ex-Nazi. However, Beast Boy’s fate was not as positive as Larry or Cliffs, for it was Galtry who ultimately found the boy.

The Flash Spectacular 1978 [1978]: The Teen Titans (Robin, Aqualad, Wonder Girl, Speedy, Ma!, and Harlequin) attend Wally (Kid Flash) West’s high-school graduation in their civilian identities. This story takes place after the events of Teen Titans #53.

Green Lantern #85-86 [1971]: Green Arrow, Green Lantern and Black Canary begin working together, leaving Speedy without much support; Speedy becomes hooked on heroin; While a disbelieving Green Arrow was stunned into inaction, Roy overcame his addiction with the aid of Green Lantern and Black Canary, and thereupon severed relations with the Emerald Archer to go out on his own. Although this story appears during the Teen Titans series, this story takes place [chronologically] AFTER events of Teen Titans #43.

Hawk & Dove (first series) #1 [1968]: Dismayed by his father’s strong stand against the Hawk’s violent vigilantism, Don Hall vows never to become the Dove again, but is nevertheless forced into action when he learns the true identity of the leader of a criminal gang, the Drop-Outs, and that the Hawk may be walking into a death-trap.

Hawk & Dove (first series) #2 [1968]: While vacationing on their uncle’s farm, Hank and Don Hall are forced to assume their costumed identities to protect their parents from escaped convicts.

Hawk & Dove (first series) #3 [1968]: Their efforts to stop the criminal known as the Cat prove disastrous for both the Hawk and the Dove: Hawk’s battle with the Cat only results in the destruction of property and more bad publicity for him, while Dove’s attempt to curtail a violent confrontation between the criminal and the police results in the unnecessary shooting of the Cat. Second Story: When a friend’s father is beaten up by a loan shark’s underlings, Hawk goes after the perpetrators while Dove tries to stop the victim’s son from taking a costly revenge.

Hawk & Dove (first series) #4 [1969]: Don Hall is questioned by police when an artist friend is murdered; Hawk foils a museum robbery only to find that apparently nothing has been taken; and a new mayoral candidate takes an even stronger stand against costumed crimefighters than Judge Hall. Hawk and Dove put the clues together to discover that candidate Heinsite is secretly behind the substitution of valuable artworks with forgeries painted by Don’s friend, who was killed when he threatened to talk to the police.

Hawk & Dove (first series) #5 [1969]: A man who once saved their father’s life is accused of robbery, and Hawk and Dove discover that the two wit-nesses against him are members of a hot car ring. When Hawk is critically injured (though not shot, as claimed on the cover), Dove horrifies himself when he abandons his pacifism and beats the supposed killer unmercifully. The story continues in part in Teen Titans #21, in which Hawk and Dove team up with the Teen Titans immediately following this story.

Hawk & Dove (first series) #6 [1969]: Hawk and Dove pursue their usual separate methods to locate the kidnapper of their father and to rescue the judge, only to find that he still disapproves of their crime-fighting activities. This is the final issue of The Hawk and the Dove. The Hawk and the Dove again team up with the Teen Titans in Teen Titans #25, following this story and become semi-permanent members of their team.

Showcase #59 [1965]: The team’s third try-out, “The Return of the Teen Titans.” This time, the villains were three super-villains who imitated three gimmicky rock musicians, the Flips (a surfer, a cheerleader, and a motorcyclist) to frame their legal counterparts for the crimes they committed. First Nick Cardy as Titans artist.

Showcase #75 [1966]: A mysterious Voice gives heightened physical abilities and costumed identities which can be magically assumed in the presence of injustice to two high-school student brothers, Hank and Don Hall, whose heroic alter egos resemble their personal philosophies: Hank, a militant, becomes the violent, quick-tempered Hawk, and Don, a pacifist, becomes the quiet, reasoning, but indecisive Dove. Their efforts to combat organized crime in their home town of Elmond and to foil the attempted murder of their father, a tough-minded but respected judge, are complicated when, unaware of their true identities, their father disapproves of the Hawk and the Dove as lawless vigilantes. First appearance and origins of Hawk & Dove.

Superman Family #191-194 [1978]: Mal (as Guardian), Karen (not as Bumblebee), and Speedy help Jimmy Olsen and the Newsboy Legion locate the Golden Guardian. This story takes place after the events of Teen Titans #53. Jimmy Olsen and the Newsboy Legion try to track down the original Guardian. Since Mal Duncan is the latest person to assume the Guardian costume, they track him down in Farmingdale, LI and help him defeat some petty crooks. Mal informs them that he found the costume in the Titans Lair, and Roy Harper may be able to provide more information. Jimmy and the Newsboy Legion track down Roy Harper and become emroiled in a cloning conspiracy by Project Cadmus. They thwart the plan and locate Jim Harper, the Guardian. Jimmy Olsen and the Newsboy Legion would eventually discover that Speedy was the nephew of Jim Harper, the police officer who was once the super-hero called the Guardian. With the Guardian’s demise, his uniform was inherited by Roy, as his last living relative, and was thereafter used by Mal as he took on the Guardian identity.

Wonder Woman #265-266 [1980]: Back-up story featuring Wonder Girl. Donna Troy is informed that Mr. Jupiter has died, and she is the heir to his fortune. It is actually a trap to lure Wonder Girl as she is captured by Mr. Jupiter’s secretary, who calls herself ‘Perfection.’ Perfection is intrigued by the Amazon race and wants to study Wonder Girl as a model of ‘perfection’ and rid the world of imperfection. Wonder Girl had sensed a trap and feigns helplessness long enough to get the drop on Perfection, and frees a captured, very-much-alive Mr. Jupiter.

World’s Finest #205 [1971]: The Teen Titans have settled into a peaceful life in the quiet town of Fairfield. Superman soon discovers that an “alien thought control unit” crash landed on Earth near Fairfield, brainwashing it’s population. The unit based an idyllic template from scanning the mind of resident Mr. Handley. Superman, immune to the mind control, saves the Teen Titans and the town of Fairfield from the mind control.


 


End of titanstower.com transmission. About this author:  Bill Walko is an author and artist and the man behind titanstower.com. He's been reading and drawing comics since he was 5 years old and hasn't stopped since. Read more from this author


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