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Series Index: New Teen Titans v1





New Teen Titans #1 [1980] to 40 [1984]
& Tales of the Teen Titans #41 [1984] to 91 [1988]

With the return of Len Wein and Marv Wolfman to DC Comics in 1979, new life was breathed into the Titans franchise once more. This time Robin, Wonder Girl and Kid Flash would be joined by new arrivals: the mysterious mystic, Raven; the alien powerhouse, Starfire; the half-man/half-machine, Cyborg; plus the newly-renamed Beast Boy as Changeling. Wolfman was joined by up-and-coming artist George Pérez on the title. Wolfman remembers, “As I fleshed out the characters I ran into Geroge Pérez at the Marvel offices. I mentioned to him that I was working on a new version of the Titans and would he be interested in drawing it. George thought the book would last maybe a half dozen issues, and there was a chance he could also draw the Justice League, which was the book he really wanted to do, so he said yes. George then designed the look of each and every one of the characters.”

The Wolfman/Pérez Titans era is one of the mostly fondly regarded creative runs in comic history. Marv and George reimaged the Titans with modern sensibilities, fascinating characters, gorgeous artwork, and bold storytelling.

The logo of DC Comics Presents #26, a headline blared, “Extra! A special free 16-page preview of the New Teen Titans!” In that issue, the mysterious Raven invaded Robin’s dreams with a vision of things to come. After that mysterious build-up, the action resumed in The New Teen Titans #1 a few weeks later. Raven popped up in Dick Grayson’s bedroom in a puff of smoke. “I invaded your dreams only so that you may come to know me.. and to know that, when at last, I appeared before you it was to seek your aid!” Specifically, she sought aid for the golden-skinned Starfire, who had fought her way out of a slaver’s starship and made her getaway in a shuttle-craft to Earth. Presumably injured in the landing, she was still being stalked by the slavers. For the first two issues of The New Teen Titans, the heroes faced and solved Starfire’s problem – and went on to fight the world’s greatest assassin, Deathstroke The Terminator. The Teen Titans went on to battle the Fearsome Five before they faced their greatest challenge to date: A showdown with Raven’s Demonic father, Trigon, in New Teen Titans #6.

New Teen Titans #8 followed with “A Day In the Lives,” an entertaining series of vignettes which saw Starfire becoming, of all things, the latest teenage jeans model, Donna Troy as big-league fashion photographer, Raven separating her soul-self from her body, Changeling and Cyborg getting together, Wally West being recognized as a “man” by his parents in Blue Valley, and, finally, a Ten Little Indians murder plot wherein executives of Dayton Industries (Gar Logan’s inherited firm) are being shot to death one-by-one by puppets. The issue itself was a landmark. At the time, it was unheard of to have a whole issue devoted to personal lives.

The Doom Patrol, who appeared in the Sixties in their own comic, had been destroyed as a team. In New Teen Titans #10-#15, the group finally was avenged. Robotman and Mento (Changeling’s foster father) joined forces with The Titans, led by Changeling, and mounted an all-out attack on the African fortress of the villains Madame Rouge and Captain Zahl. In the end, Mento, Robotman, and Changeling strode from the site of battle arm-in-arm, the shades of the slain members of The Doom Patrol – The Chief, Negative Man, and Elasti-Giri -symbolically at their backs.

The next year of the title were built mainly around two major menaces: Brother Blood and Blackfire. Brother Blood’s menace took the form of a cultish religion in New Teen Titans #21. Blackfire, alias Komand’r, Starfire’s sister, showed up in the closing pages of New Teen Titans #22 and initiated a four-issue war of vengeance against Koriand’r which climaxed in New Teen Titans Annual #1.

New Teen Titans #26 and #27 dealt with the social issue of runaways; #28 focused on Terra, the newest Titan, a girl with earth-shaping powers; The Brotherhood of Evil was back with issues #29-31, which brought Speedy back into the fold; a pair of half-Vietnamese super-youths, Thunder and Lightning, were introduced in #32; and a story which began in #34 and climaxed in New Teen Titans Annual #2 introduced The Vigilante, a District-Attorney-turned-Executioner who blew away master criminals with a submachine gun.

The character of Terra would join the team in the third year, and longtime members Kid Flash and Robin would leave the group, setting the stage for the Titans’ biggest challenge yet in “The Judas Contract,” where they would be betrayed by one of their own. Terra – unknown to The Titans – turned out to be a villain, a spy working with The Terminator, as revealed in New Teen Titans #34. Wolfman recalls the shocking story, “George and I wanted a Titan who betrayed the others. We also wanted to play against every reader conception of who characters are. George and I knew her whole story before we began and we knew she would die. We set the story up with her trying to destroy the Statue of Liberty to show she was the bad girl, but we knew if George drew her as a cute kid everyone would simply assume she would be “turned” from the dark side because that’s the way it was always done which is why that wouldn’t be the way we did it.”

The conclusion of “The Judas Contract” in Tales of the Teen Titans Annual #3 featured new member Jericho introduced Robin in his new identity of Nightwing. Following that episode, Aqualad and Aquagirl helped the Titans defeat the H.I.V.E. once and for all in Tales of the Teen Titans #45-47. After that, the Titans attended the wedding of Donna Troy in Tales of the Teen Titans #50. The final new issues of Tales of the Teen Titans featuring the introduction of the mysterious Azrael, the trial of the Terminator and the return of the Fearsome Five.

With the success of the New Teen Titans as DC Comics’ best-selling title, the decision was made to launch a second New Teen Titans monthly series (printed on better paper and sold only to comic shops) which would run simultaneous to the first (still printed on newsprint). New Teen Titans changed its title to Tales of the Teen Titans with issue #41. Later, New Teen Titans (second series) #1 hit comic shops at the same time Tales of the Teen Titans #45 was published. For Titans fans, it meant twice as many new stories for one full year. After one year of publication, the original series would convert to reprints of issues originally published in the second series, and the second series would become the new primary title. With Tales of the Teen Titans #60, the series began reprinting New Teen Titans (second series), starting with #1. After awhile, fans stopped buying the reprints in Tales, and the title was canceled with Tales of the Teen Titans #91.

The Teen Titans continued to flourish, as the second series forged on for a total of 130 issues.


Series Index:
New Teen Titans #1-40
New Teen Titans Annual #1-2
Tales of the Teen Titans #41-44
Tales of the Teen Titans Annual #3

Specials & Mini-Series:
Marvel and DC Present the Uncanny X-Men and the New Teen Titans #1
New Teen Titans Drug Awareness Giveaways #1-3
Tales of the Teen Titans (mini-series) #1-4

Crossover Index:
Action Comics #546
Action Comics #584
Batman and the Outsiders #5 (crossover with New Teen Titans #37)
Best of DC (Blue Ribbon Digest) #18
Captain Carrot and His Amazing Zoo Crew #20
Crisis on Infinite Earths #1-12
DC Comics Presents #26
DC Sampler #1-2
Supergirl #20
Vigilante #3
Wonder Woman (first series) #287
Wonder Woman (first series) #293
World’s Finest #300

Key Issues and Storylines:
DC Comics Presents #26: First appearance of New Teen Titans; Leads into issue #1.
New Teen Titans #1-6: The Teen Titans gather to battle the H.I.V.E., Deathstroke and defeat Trigon.
New Teen Titans #8: “A Day In The Life” reveals the team’s personal lives.
New Teen Titans #13-15: Robotman and Mento team up with the Titans in a quest to find the killers of the Doom Patrol.
Tales of the Teen Titans (mini-series) #1-4: Origins of Cyborg, Raven, Changeling and Starfire.
New Teen Titans #21-22: The team confronts the Cult of Brother Blood.
New Teen Titans #23-25, Annual #1: The Titans travel to Tamaran as Starfire battles her sister, Blackfire.
New Teen Titans #28: The Titans meet Terra.
New Teen Titans #30: Terra joins the team.
New Teen Titans #34: After the Titans battle Deatshtroke, Terra is revealed as a traitor.
New Teen Titans #38: “Who Is Donna Troy?” Dick Grayson discovers Donna’s past.
New Teen Titans #39-40: The Titans battle Brother Blood again.
Tales of the Teen Titans #42-44, Annual #3: “The Judas Contract” Terra helps Deathstroke deliver the Titans to the H.I.V.E.; Dick Grayson becomes Nightwing; Jericho debuts.
Tales of the Teen Titans #45-47: Aqualad and Aquagirl team up with the Titans to end the H.I.V.E. once and for all.
Tales of the Teen Titans #50: Donna Troy marries Terry Long.
Tales of the Teen Titans #54-55: After Deasthroke’s botched trial, Changeling intends to kill him.

Notable Creative Runs:
Marv Wolfman, Writer: New Teen Titans #1-40, Tales of the Teen Titans #41-58
George Pérez, Artist: New Teen Titans #1-40, Tales of the Teen Titans #41-44


Series Index: New Teen Titans I


 
Index Below Includes (in order):

>> New Teen Titans/Tales of the Teen Titans issues
>> New Teen Titans Annuals
>> Titans Related Mini-Series
>> Titans Related Specials
>> Titans Related Crossovers/Appearances of Note: 1980-1985


DC Comics Presents #26 [1980]
cover date: November 1980

Credits:
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: A 16-page preview to New Teen Titans. In the midst of a confrontation with terrorists, Robin finds himself drawn repeatedly into a dream-adventure in which he is a member of a revived Teen Titans team. The New Teen Titans’ members include Kid Flash, Wonder Girl, Beast Boy (now called the Changeling), and three new super-powered crimefighters: Cyborg, Starfire, and Raven. Robin helps police capture the terrorists, while simultaneously aiding his mystifying new “teammates” to battle an extradimensional protoplasmic creature running amok at S.T.A.R. Laboratories. Unknown to the Teen Wonder, his hallucination is engineered by Raven as part of her plan to eventually recruit the New Teen Titans as her allies against the demon Trigon.

Notes:
>> First appearances of Raven, Cyborg & Starfire.
>> First appearance of New Teen Titans.
>> First appearance of Titans Tower.
>> Beast Boy now known as Changeling, as of this issue.
>> This preview leads into New Teen Titans #1.


New Teen Titans #1 [1980]
cover date: November 1980

Credits:
“The New Teen Titans”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Starfire, aka Princess Koriand’r of the planet Tamaran, escapes from Commander Trogaar and his Gordanian slavers, and crash-lands on Earth. To help her, Raven, a mysterious young woman possessing empathic powers, reorganizes the disbanded Teen Titans. The heroes she recruits include Robin, Kid Flash, Wonder Girl, and Changeling (the former Beast Boy), plus a new member, Cyborg, a black, ex-athlete whose body has been rebuilt with mechanical parts. Together, the New Teen Titans battle the Gordanians in the United Nations Plaza, but fail to prevent the recapture of Starfire. Invading the aliens’ ship, the Titans rescue Starfire, and Cyborg and Changeling sabotage their craft, causing it to explode.

Notes:
>> First appearances of Grant Wilson.
>> Text page “You Can Come Home Again!” (by Marv Wolfman) includes biographical information on Marv Wolfman and Len Wein, and details behind the creation of the New Teen Titans.


New Teen Titans #2 [1980]
cover date: December 1980

Credits:
“Today… the Terminator”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis:The New Teen Titans battle a gang of hijackers who turn out to be robots, and Starfire learns English by absorbing knowledge of the language through physical contact (by kissing Robin). Meanwhile, Kid Flash continues to wonder how Raven manipulated him into becoming a Titans member again after he had foresworn his superhero career, and Cyborg continues to duel verbally with his father, whom he holds responsible for his half-machine state. Cyborg is then the first Titan to be attacked by Grant Wilson, a gangland-connected resident of the East Village in whose apartment Starfire had taken shelter from the Gordanians.

Wilson has now been transformed into a super-powered assassin – the Ravager, by the H.I.V.E., in order to destroy the Titans. Deathstroke the Terminator, a professional hit-man on whose powers those of the Ravager are patterned, and who is actually Grant Wilson’s father, joins him in his attack on the Titans. However, the Ravager dies as a side-effect of the process that gave him his super-human abilities. As the H.I.V.E. had planned from the beginning, the Terminator then takes on his son’s contract to destroy the Teen Titans in his stead.

Notes:
>> First appearances of Slade Wilson aka Deathstroke, The Terminator.
>> First Appearance of William Randolph Wintergreen.
>> Death of Grant Wilson, Ravager.
>> The H.I.V.E. agent that recruits Grant is later revealed to be Slade’s rival, Bill Walsh, in Deathstroke #4. In Deathstroke #1-4, Walsh assumes the Ravager costume and identity.
>> First appearance of Trigon (voice only).


New Teen Titans #3 [1981]
cover date: January 1981

Credits:
“The Fearsome Five”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez (layouts)
Inker: Frank Chiarmonte (finished art)
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Dr. Light recruits his own super-team of villains, including Mammoth, Shimmer, Gizmo, and Psimon, to battle the New Teen Titans. Meanwhile, Starfire relates to her teammates the story of how she was sold into slavery as a child to end a war that had ravaged her home planet. Raven abruptly appears and sends the Titans into an inconclusive battle with the newly-formed Fearsome Five. She then discovers that one of the villains, Psimon, is secretly an agent of Trigon, the menace she had originally organized the Titans to battle. Later, as the Titans investigate the “Titans Tower” headquarters which has been built for them by parties unknown, Raven reveals a connection between Trigon’s planned takeover of Earth and the heroes of the Justice League of America. Before they can act on this information, all the Titans except Raven are defeated and captured in a second battle with the Fearsome Five.

Notes:
>> First appearances of Gizmo (Mikron O’Jeneus), Mammoth (Baran Flinders), Shimmer (Selinda Flinders) and Psimon (Simon Jones).
>> First appearance of the Fearsome Five.


New Teen Titans #4 [1981]
cover date: February 1981

Credits:
“Against All Friends”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: The Fearsome Five, now under the leadership of Psimon, release the captured Titans with their memories of the previous battle erased and under a compulsion to defeat the Justice League. Raven is unsuccessful in her efforts to halt the JLA’s misguided interference with the attempts of a group of sorcerers to stop Trigon from coming to Earth, to enlist the aid of her mother and the other disciples of Azarath in the struggle, and to prevent the eventual fight between the two super-teams. When the dust clears, Trigon’s coming has become inevitable, but when Zatanna reveals an evil secret in Raven’s past, and that she had made Kid Flash believe he loved her in order to recruit him to the Titans, both groups become distrustful of Raven and desert her.

Notes:
>> The Justice League guest-stars.
>> Raven’s full face revealed this issue.
>> First appearance of Arella, Raven’s mother.


New Teen Titans #5 [1981]
cover date: March 1981

Credits:
“Trigon Lives”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: Curt Swan
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Despite their displeasure with her methods, the Titans rally to help Raven defeat Goronn, Trigon’s advance warrior. She then reveals her origins as Trigon’s daughter by an Earth woman, while the demon materializes on Earth and begins to wreak havoc. Finally, after Trigon has easily defeated the Titans, Raven agrees to accompany Trigon and rule at his side, but only if he will spare the Earth. Trigon agrees, and the two vanish.

Notes:
>> Origins of Raven, Trigon and Arella are revealed. Arella’s real name – Angela Roth – is not revealed until Teen Titans (third series) #8.


New Teen Titans #6 [1981]
cover date: April 1981

Credits:
“Last Kill!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Pablo Marcos
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Raven is aghast at the horrors perpetrated by Trigon on his homeworld, and learns that he has no intention of abandoning his invasion of Earth despite his promise to her. While unable to persuade the disciples of Temple Azarath to aid them against Trigon, the Titans are able to have them transport the super-heroes to Trigon’s world to battle him anew. The Titans are again easily bested by the demon, but Arella, Raven’s mother, helps her to escape Trigon’s influence and to free her teammates. By combining their magical and scientific powers, the Titans are able to banish Trigon through a dimensional doorway. Arella sacrifices herself as eternal guardian of the gateway against Trigon’s escape.

Notes:
>> Trigon defeated this issue; Appears next in New Teen Titans (second series) #1-5.
>> Arella appears next in New Teen Titans (second series) #1-5.


New Teen Titans #7 [1981]
cover date: May 1981

Credits:
“Assault on Titans’ Tower”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Titans’ Tower is unveiled. The Fearsome Five return to free Psimon from his extra-dimensional banishment by Trigon, and to take over Titans’ Tower in order to lure the Teen Titans into a trap. The heroes are stymied when Dr. Light holds Cyborg’s father, Silas Stone, hostage, and Prof. Stone is revealed as. the creator of the new Titans headquarters. Then the last-minute intervention of Wonder Girl frees Stone, and the Titans revive to defeat the Fearsome Five. In the aftermath of battle, Prof. Stone is finally able to reveal to Cyborg the secret of his creation, and that the elder Stone is slowly dying of radiation poisoning from the same accident. Over the next two months until Silas Stone’s inevitable death, father and son are reunited and reconciled at last.

Notes:
>> Origin of Titans Tower revealed.
>> Blueprints of the first Titans Tower are included in this story.
>> Death of Silas Stone, Cyborg’s father.


New Teen Titans #8 [1981]
cover date: June 1981

Credits:
“A Day in the Lives”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Between cases, the Teen Titans experience several pertinent Incidents in their civilian identities. When Starfire meets Donna (Wonder Girl) Troy for lunch, she also meets Donna’s boyfriend, Terry Long, and gets a job as a fashion model at the agency for which Donna is a photographer. Raven uses her mystic “soulself” to defeat campus terrorists, and experiences almost unbearable horrors when her astral projection remains separated from her body for too long a period of time.

Changeling is called upon to investigate mysterious deaths among the Board of Directors of Dayton Industries, of which he is in charge in the absence of his foster-father, Steve (Mento) Dayton. Cyborg attempts an unsuccessful reunion with his former girlfriend (from before his transformation), then unexpectedly becomes friends with Sarah Simms, a teacher, and her class of handicapped students. Kid Flash discusses his life as a reluctant super-hero with his parents.

Notes:
>> Marv Wolfman and George Pérez coplotted this issue.
>> First Appearance of Terrence Arthur “Terry” Long.
>> First Appearance of Sarah Simms.
>> Vernon Questor, Steve Dayton’s business manager.
>> First appearance of Marcy Reynolds, Cyborg’s old girlfriend.


New Teen Titans #9 [1981]
cover date: July 1981

Credits:
“Like Puppets on a String”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Changeling asks Robin to help investigate the murders of several Dayton Industries executives, which are traced to Green Lantern’s old foe, the Puppeteer, now in league with the H.I.V.E. Meanwhile, through his robot puppets, Puppeteer takes control of Cyborg, Kid Flash, Starfire, and Wonder Girl, and turns them against their teammates. Raven’s soul-self is finally able to break their trance, and the Titans unite to battle Puppeteer and his toy robotic army. When the villain is defeated, the H.I.V.E., attempts to destroy him for his failure. While the heroes defeat the Puppeteer, the Terminator steals the Promethium formula.

Notes:
>> Return of Deathstroke this issue.


Best of DC (Blue Ribbon Digest) #18
cover date: July 1981

Credits:
“Reunion” plus reprints of other Titans Tales
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: Carmine Infantino
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Description: This DC Digest contained mostly reprints of Teen Titans comics from the 1970’s. In addition, however, was an original 10-page tale called “Reunion.” Reprinted Stories: “Titans Fit the Battle of Jericho” (from Teen Titans #20); “Citadel of Fear” (from Teen Titans #21); “Halfway to Holocaust” (from Teen Titans #22); “Skis of Death” (from Teen Titans #24; previously reprinted in DC Super Stars #1).

Synopsis: After an unsuccessful attempt to halt a drug-smuggling operation, former Titans Speedy and Aqualad join forces with the New Titans to close the case.

Notes:
>> Speedy is established as a government agent in this story.
>> The events of this story occur after New Teen Titans #9.


New Teen Titans #10 [1981]
cover date: August 1981

Credits:
“Promethium: Unbound”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Changeling and Cyborg receive a message from Changeling’s Doom Patrol ex-partner, Robotman, currently searching for Steve Dayton who is in turn searching for the killers of the Doom Patrol. Meanwhile, Cyborg’s friend Sarah Simms is kidnapped by the Terminator. Terminator fights an inconclusive battle against Starfire, and then attempts to auction off plans to a Dayton Industries secret research project code-named Promethium, a self-regenerating energy-source. Using Sarah as a hostage, Terminator forces the Titans to act as guinea-pigs in a test of the Promethium explosive for officials of the H.I.V.E. The Titans escape to battle Terminator and his mercenary army, but when Changeling pursues the escaping assassin alone, he is mortally wounded as Terminator escapes.

Notes:
>> none


New Teen Titans #11 [1981]
cover date: September 1981

Credits:
“When Titans Clash”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: The three female Titans take Changeling to the Amazons home of Paradise Island where he is treated with the Purple Ray, while Robin, Kid Flash, and Cyborg take up the search for Robotman, Mento, and the Doom Patrol’s murderers. In the underground realm of Tartarus, Hyperion, one of the legendary Titans of Greek mythology, progenitors of the Olympian gods, frees himself from his ages-old imprisonment, and appears above Paradise Island. When Wonder Girl confronts him, he entrances her and she falls in love with him. Overcoming Starfire and Raven, Hyperion takes Wonder Girl back to Tartarus, where they free his fellow Titans. Raven, Starfire, Queen Hippolyta and the Amazons battle the Titans and attempt to recover Wonder Girl, but she refuses their aid. The Titans vanish, intending to invade Olympus and defeat the gods who had imprisoned them.

Notes:
>> First appearance of Hyperion.
>> The whereabouts of Thia, the missing twelfth Titan, and her identity as the mother of Lilith, are revealed in New Teen Titans (second series) #7-8.
>> The events of this issue have been negated by the Crisis on Infinite Earths.


New Teen Titans #12 [1981]
cover date: October 1981

Credits:
“Clash of the Titans”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: In an epic battle, Wonder Girl and the ancient Titans attack and defeat the gods of Olympus. Athena, goddess of wisdom, brings the other female Teen Titans and the Amazons to Olympus to confront their foes a second time. Starfire frees the captive Zeus, and Wonder Girl is freed of Hyperion’s love enchantment. The Titans realize the error of their ways and resolve to live in Tartarus, returning Olympus to the gods, and Wonder Girl goes back to Paradise Island with her friends.

Notes:
>> Terry Long’s age, 29, his college, Manhattan University, revealed in this story.
>> The events of this issue have been negated by the Crisis on Infinite Earths.


New Teen Titans #13 [1981]
cover date: November 1981

Credits:
“Friends and Foes Alike”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Wonder Girl returns home briefly to see Terry Long, while Starfire competes in an Amazon tournament on Paradise Island. Changeling is healed of his wounds by the Purple Ray, only to have it drive him temporarily insane, causing him to take the form of a brachiosaurus and to attack the Amazons. Raven’s soul-self overcomes him and returns him to normal. Meanwhile, Robin, Kid Flash, and Cyborg discover and revive a disabled Robotman in the Ugandan jungle. They also uncover a hidden underground city which is the stronghold of Madame Rouge and General Zahl, the killers of the Doom Patrol. Invading the fortress, they rescue a drugged Steve Dayton, who had been captured by the villains while on his quest.

Notes:
>> Steve (Mento) Dayton and Robotman guest-star.


New Teen Titans #14 [1981]
cover date: December 1981

Credits:
“Revolution!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Changeling and the female Titans rejoin their teammates, and Steve Dayton, recovering his Mento uniform, proves to be a brainwashed pawn of Madame Rouge and General ZahI. Mento attacks the Titans until overcome by Raven through an illusion. The Titans then trail Madame Rouge, General Zahl, and the villains’ now-airborne headquarters to the island nation of Zandla, which the evildoers attack. The other Titans are defeated and captured during the battle, while Changeling, separated from them, is taken prisoner by a revived Brotherhood of Evil led by the Brain and Monsieur Mallah, former archenemies of the Doom Patrol.

Notes:
>> Steve (Mento) Dayton and Robotman guest-star.
>> Mento gets a new costume this issue.
>> First appearance of New Brotherhood of Evil.
>> First appearance of Warp, Houngan, Phobia and Plasmus.


New Teen Titans #15 [1982]
cover date: January 1982

Credits:
“The Brotherhood of Evil Lives Again”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: The captive Robotman and the Titans are placed in a “Devolving Pit” causing them to begin changing into Neanderthals. General ZahI and Madame Rouge continue their attempted takeover of Zandia, which nation is actually a haven for escaped criminals. Changeling joins forces with the new Brotherhood of Evil to attack the villainous duo and their followers and to free his teammates, with the help of Robotman. In the ensuing melee, Zahl is killed when one of his bullets ricochets off Robotman’s metal body, and Madame Rouge meets her death accidentally in a struggle with Changeling. The Titans and the Brotherhood of Evil team up to escape from the villains’ floating fortress before it explodes, and the Brotherhood is allowed to go free for their help. The Doom Patrol avenged at last, Changeling and Robotman are reunited with Mento.

Notes:
>> Steve (Mento) Dayton and Robotman guest-star.
>> Death of Madame Rogue and General Zahl.
>> The New Teen Titans help Wonder Woman battle Dr. Cyber in Wonder Woman #287 following this story; then the Titans (except Raven) provide Superman with information on the H.I.V.E. in Action #532.


New Teen Titans #16 [1982]
cover date: February 1982

Credits:
“Starfire Unleashed!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Raven’s pacifist beliefs lead to misunderstandings with her classmates on her first day at college. Starfire begins a whirlwind romance with a young man named Franklin Crandall, unaware that he is actually a hireling of a member of the H.I.V.E., sent to learn the Titans’ secrets. After their rescue of a model friend of Donna Troy’s from mobsters, the Titans accompany Starfire to meet her beau, only to discover that he has been murdered by his employer after a falling-out. Wonder Girl prevents Starfire from taking vengeance by killing the H.I.V.E., agent, who is later eliminated by his own associates for disobeying orders. Though Robin and Wonder Girl discover Crandall’s true motives, they mercifully do not enlighten the grieving Starfire.

Notes:
>> First and Last appearance of Franklin Crandall, Starfire’s boyfriend.


New Teen Titans #17 [1982]
cover date: March 1982

Credits:
“The Possessing of Francis[sic] Kane”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: After an automobile accident that killed her father and brother but which she survived, Frances Kane, a long-time friend of Wally (Kid Flash) West, seemingly becomes a focus of destructive supernatural energies, and her mother becomes involved in witchcraft and seances. Wally brings Raven to investigate, and eventually the entire Titans team becomes embroiled in the affair. Despite their efforts, the energies emanating from the girl almost destroy Titans’ Tower and New York. Cyborg deduces that the energies are magnetic, not magical, in nature, and uses a STAR-created anti-magnetic device to cure Frances. Unknown to the Titans, Frances’s “possession” is actually caused by Green Lantern’s enemy, Dr. Polaris, in an attempt to free himself from an extra-dimensional exile.

Notes:
>> First appearance of Frances Kane.


New Teen Titans #18 [1982]
cover date: April 1982

Credits:
“A Pretty Girl is Like a — Maladi!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: When his son is killed by an American In El Salvador, Soviet official Marek Slavik takes revenge on the United States by sending his secretary, Maladi Malanova, to America as a courier, with the young woman unaware that she is now the carrier of a deadly disease. Learning of this, the Soviet government dispatches super-hero Starfire to the U.S. to stop Maladi.

F.B.I. agent King Faraday alerts the Titans to Starfire’s arrival, and a battle ensues when they mistake him for the plague-carrier. Having discovered the truth, the Titans must still race to locate Maladi before Starfire, who plans to end her threat by killing her, inasmuch as her own condition Is now in-curable. The Titans fight Starfire to a stalemate and Maladi is finally taken to a hospital to die in peace. Only then does Starfire, condemned for his attitude by the Titans, especially Kid Flash, throughout their encounter, reveal that the girl had been his fiancee.

Notes:
>> Return of Starfire I, Leonid Kovar; Last seen in Teen Titans (first series) #18; Real name, Leonid Kovar, revealed and origin retold in this story; appears next in Crisis on Infinite Earths #5.
>> Leonid (Starfire) Kovar’s first appearance was written by Marv Wolfman & Len Wein.
>> Last Appearance of Leonid as Starfire. Russian super-hero name, the Red Star, revealed in Action Comics #551, though he does not appear in that issue.


New Teen Titans #19 [1982]
cover date: May 1982

Credits:
“The Light Fantastic”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Escaping from prison and swearing off his vendettas against super-heroes, Dr. Light robs an Indian museum exhibit, only to run afoul of visiting museum curator Carter Hall in his Hawkman identity. When he accidentally brings to life powerful incarnations of the deity Vishnu, Light deliberately leads the creatures to Teen Titans headquarters, hoping his foes will be destroyed while protecting him from the vengeful mythological beings. When Robin and Hawkman capture Light and learn how he activated the creatures, Starfire uses her starbolts, focused through Dr. Light’s special lenses, to destroy the beings, and Light is returned to jail.

Notes:
>> Guest-stars Carter (Hawkman) Hall


New Teen Titans #20 [1982]
cover date: June 1982

Credits:
“Dear Mom and Dad” and
“A Titanic Tale of Titans’ Tomfoolery” (5 Pages)
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis, “Dear Mom and Dad”: Kid Flash writes a letter to his parents, apprising them of recent events involving himself and the other Teen Titans: a new super-villain calling himself the Disruptor attacks Cyborg and Changeling in the New York sewers; the Titans throw a surprise birthday party for Cyborg; and Kid Flash himself is captured by the Disruptor and his father, an old foe of Batman’s known as “Brains” Beldon. The Titans counterattack, only, to have the Disruptor turn their own powers against them, until he is defeated by Raven’s soul-self.

Synopsis, “A Titanic Tale of Titans’ Tomfoolery”: Mad scientist Igor Igorigorigorivich kidnaps Marv Wolfman and George Pérez from Earth-Prime in order to learn the Teen Titans’ secrets from the creators of their comic-book adventures. Fortunately, the Titans appear in time to rescue the pair and to battle Igorigorigorivich’s robots, after which Marv and George are returned to the Earth-Prime offices of DC Comics.

Notes:
>> First appearance of Disruptor (Michael Beldon).
>> Cyborg celebrates his 19th birthday this issue.
>> The second story also features Marv Wolfman, George Pérez, Romeo Tanghal, Len Wein, Karen Berger, Dick Giordano, other staff members of DC Comics, and Len Wein’s teddy-bear, Fluffy.
>> Wonder Girl, Starfire, and Raven help Wonder Woman and other super-heroines battle the Adjudicator and the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse in Wonder Woman #293 following the events of this issue. Then the New Teen Titans go on a camping trip together in Tales of the New Teen Titans (mini-series) #1-4.


Tales of the Teen Titans (mini-series) #1-4 [1982]
cover date: June 1982 to September 1982

Credits:
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Brett Breeding, Pablo Marcos
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis, issue #1: Origin of Cyborg. At Changeling’s suggestion, the New Teen Titans take a week-long camping and hiking trip together in the Grand Canyon. Conversation around the campfire leads to Cyborg’s telling the story of his childhood and his origin. As a youngster, Victor Stone was used by his research scientist parents in their intelligence-boosting experiments, with the result that he became a child genius. However, he lacked any normal peer-group companionship, until he met street-gang leader Ron Evers, who involved him in petty crime. At his mother’s insistence, Victor was then allowed to attend public school rather than continuing with a private tutor, whereupon he became an outstanding athlete, forsaking his parents’ dream of a scientific career for him. His injury in a gang fight deepened the rift between Victor and his parents, and ended his friendship with Ron, as well.

Then, the accidental escape of a protoplasmic creature from another dimension in an experiment of the Stones’ resulted in the death of Victor’s mother and his own seemingly fatal injury. Victor was then rebuilt by his father as Cyborg, a being half-man and half-mechanical parts. After a five-month period during which he learned to control his new body, Cyborg moved out on his own, only to discover that his transformation had cost him both his girlfriend and his athletic career. He was then recruited by Ron Evers, who intended to make him a scapegoat in a plot to blow up the United Nations Building. Instead, Cyborg foiled the plot, and Evers was lost and presumed dead in the aftermath of their battle.

Synopsis, issue #2: Origin of Raven. When Raven is wakened screaming by a nightmare during their camping trip, the other Teen Titans persuade her to share with them the story of her childhood and origin. She retells the tale of how her mother, Arella, involved in a mystic cult, was chosen to become the bride of the demonic Trigon. Abandoned by the demon after mating with him, Arella was bent on suicide when she was taken in by the pacifistic disciples of Temple Azarath, a group who had centuries earlier forsaken life on Earth to pursue their own nonviolent lifestyle. In their interdimensional world, Raven, Arella’s daughter by Trigon, was born.

Fearing that the child would bring evil among them, Juris, a magistrate of Azarath, attempted to cast the infant Raven into Limbo, only to be destroyed himself. Azar, the spiritual leader of the temple, then took the young Raven under her personal tutelage, instructing her in pacifism, meditation, and the submergence of her emotions, while perfecting her powers of teleportation, astral projection, and empathic healing. Later, after Azar’s death, when Raven was plagued by prophetic dreams of Trigon, she learned of her true parentage and, defying her teachers, she confronted her demon father in Limbo at his bidding. Trigon spared her and Arella after satisfying himself that, upon his return when she reached adulthood, he could seduce Raven into becoming his ally.

Synopsis, issue #3: Origin of Changeling. While roasting Wieners around the campfire (and burning most of them inadvertently while talking), Changeling recounts his origin and early life to his Teen Titans teammates. He explains how his medical researcher father accidentally gave him his shape-changing powers and green complexion while curing him of a jungle disease, how his parents later died in a flood, and how, after many adventures, he was eventually taken from the cruel guardianship of Nicholas Galtry and adopted by Steve (Mento) and Rita (ElastiGirl) Dayton and allowed to join the Doom Patrol (all told in greater detail in Doom Patrol #112-115 and #99-110).

He then goes on to relate his exploits after the demise of the Doom Patrol (in Doom Patrol #121). After a brief adventure with the earlier Teen Titans team (told in Teen Titans #50-52), he had returned to his acting job with the Space Trek: 2022 TV series, during which an old Doom Patrol foe, the Arsenal, made an unsuccessful attempt on his life. Out of work after the series’ cancellation, Gar was reunited with his high-school girlfriend, Jillian Jackson, only to have the Arsenal return and kidnap her. Trailing the armored villain to his castle hideout, Beast Boy (whose dual identity, it should be noted, was known to the world by this time) discovered that the Arsenal was actually his former guardian, Galtry, who had hired the original Arsenal to eliminate the Doom Patrol (in Doom Patrol #113) and who had now usurped that costumed criminal’s identity himself. His goal: to hold Jillian for ransom and regain the money he had lost when Gar Logan’s guardianship had been taken from him.

Beast Boy contacted Vernon Questor, who was in charge of Steve Dayton’s finances while Mento searched for the killers of the Doom Patrol, but was unable to attain the needed ransom money. Galtry then left him trapped in an airtight room while he attempted to get the ransom paid by Jillian’s father instead. Escaping, Beast Boy battled Galtry/Arsenal, shattered the villain’s armored costume, and defeated him.

Synopsis, issue #4: Origin of Starfire. As the Titans prepare to return to New York at the conclusion of their camping excursion, Starfire recounts the story of her origin. Koriand’r’s birth to the royal family of the planet Tamaran was an occasion of great joy to all but her older sister, Komand’r, who, born sickly and thus unable to fly like her peers and judged unfit to rule, deeply resented her new sibling.

As the girls grew older, Komand’r became more and more wantonly cruel, even as their father led Tamaran’s forces against the invading warships of the Citadel, first planet of the Vegan system. Eventually Komand’r and Koriand’r, together with youngster of the various Vegan worlds, were taken to be trained in combat by the Warlords of Okaara. The training culminated in a duel between the two sisters in which Komand’r cheated and disgraced herself, nearly killing Koriand’r, who nevertheless saved her sister’s life. Komand’r then defected to the Citadel, revealing Tamaran’s defense secrets and instigating a series of devastating attacks on her homeworld in which millions were killed. Finally, a truce was called on condition that Koriand’r be turned over to the Gordanians, the Citadel’s lizard-like allies, as a slave.

After six years of torture, hardship, and degradation, the future Starfire was brought before her sister, even as the Gordanians were attacked by the Psions, ancient enemies of the Citadel and consciousness scientists devoted to experimenting on other life forms. Koriand’r and Komand’r were captured by the Psions, who attempted to learn the secret of their race’s ability to fly by means of solar energy. Counterattacked by the Citadel during the experiment, the Psions left the two sisters shackled to a device channeling solar power through their bodies, with the result that both gained the power to fire powerful star-bolts from their hands.

Koriand’r escaped and freed her sister, only to be blasted and returned to the Citadel as a captive for her trouble. Eventually, she made her getaway to Earth, where she joined the Teen Titans. Their vacation at an end even as Starfire concludes her story, the Titans drink a toast to their friendship before returning home.

Notes:
>> The events of this mini-series take place between New Teen Titans #20 and #21.
>> Issue #1 features the origin of Cyborg and includes a pin-up of Cyborg.
>> Issue #2 features the origin of Raven and includes a pin-up of Raven.
>> Issue #3 features the origin of Changeling and includes a pin-up of Changeling.
>> Jillian Jackson was last seen in Doom Patrol #120; appears next in Tales of the Teen Titans #45.
>> Nicholas Galtry was last seen, behind the scenes, in Doom Patrol #113.
>> Issue #4 features the origin of Starfire and includes a pin-up of Starfire.
>> First appearance of Starfire’s sister, Princess Komand’r, Blackfire in issue #4; origin revealed; nom de guerre revealed on cover of New Teen Titans #23 and in story in issue #24.


New Teen Titans #21 [1982]
cover date: July 1982

Credits:
“Beware the Wrath of… Brother Blood”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Raven and Starfire team up to save a baseball stadium crowd from terrorists, unaware that they are being monitored from the satellite base of the criminals’ secret backer. Meanwhile, Cyborg’s ex-girlfriend, Marcy Reynolds, is murdered when she tries to escape the confines of the Church of Brother Blood, a pseudo-religious commune she had joined. Infiltrating the cult to seek information on Cyborg’s behalf, Robin, Kid Flash, Wonder Girl, and Raven (in their civilian indentities) are horrified at Brother Blood’s methods of dealing with any acolyte who tries to leave his group. Their true identities discovered, the four battle Blood and his followers, but are easily defeated, and Raven’s soul-self escapes to warn the other Titans.

Notes:
>> First Appearance of Brother Blood.
>> First Appearance of Mother Mayhem.
>> Death of Marcy Reynolds. (Last seen in issue #8).


New Teen Titans #22 [1982]
cover date: August 1982

Credits:
“Ashes to Ashes!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: The captive Wonder Girl, Kid Flash, and Raven are consigned to a pit inhabitated by a monstrous spider-like creature, as is Robin, after the latter having been tortured by Brother Blood’s sadistic “Confessor” for information. When the remaining Titans attack the Church of Brother Blood to rescue their teammates, the cult leader, with the aid of Bethany Snow, a TV newscaster who is secretly a member of his group, turns public sentiment against the Titans by making it appear that their attack is unprovoked. Cyborg causes the crash of Blood’s escaping airship, and though the villain survives, the Titans are accused of his attempted murder.

Notes:
>> First appearance of Bethany Snow, a telejournalist for WUBC News; revealed as an acolyte of Brother Blood’s cult in next issue.


New Teen Titans #23 [1982]
cover date: September 1982

Credits:
“Kidnapped!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: In the midst of official investigations into the Titans’ battle with Brother Blood and his cult, Starfire is affected by a Gordanian mental probe and goes wild. She is then taken captive by the Gordanian slavers under the command of her renegade sister, Princess Komand’r. After battling the aliens, the other Teen Titans, with the help of Aqualad, restore and commandeer two Gordanian ships and follow their foes to their orbiting mother ship. There they are overcome by robotic drones and hurled into space, where Raven’s soul-self sustains them until they can be rescued by Superman who uses a tractor beam from the Justice Leagne satellite. However, Superman is unable to aid the Titans’ rescue mission, since his powers were halved (as seen in Action ComIcs #534-541) by magical enemies, and the Gordanians escape with Starfire.

Notes:
>> Aqualad appears in this issue briefly.
>> First Appearance of Adrian Chase.


New Teen Titans #24 [1982]
cover date: October 1982

Credits:
“Citadel Strike!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: The Omega Men, a band of freedom fighters from the Vegan system who have previously encountered Green Lantern and are currently working with Superman, take the Titans with them on their return to their home system. On the Citadel homeworld, Blackfire (Princess Komand’r’s newly adopted nom de guerre) turns Starfire over to Lord Damyn, the repulsive Citadel chieftain, and learns of the Citadel’s plans to kidnap X’Hal, the Vegans’ living goddess. When the Citadel attacks Okaara, the Titans and the Omega Men aid in the planet’s defense, while Changeling, disguised as a Gordanian, attempts to smuggle Robin and Cyborg into the enemy mother ship to rescue Starfire.

Notes:
>> Guest stars: Superman (appears next in Action Comics #537) The Omega Men (last seen in Action Comics #536; Primus, Kalista, Nimbus, Harpis, Broot, Tigorr, Demonia, and Auron; the latter revealed as X’Hal’s son in this story).
>> Blackfire assumes her nom de guerre in this story.


New Teen Titans #25 [1982]
cover date: November 1982

Credits:
“War!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: While the other Titans’ attempts to infiltrate the Gordanian ranks go awry, Raven is almost overcome by the evil Trigon side of her personality as she struggles to heal those wounded in the ongoing battle, and Demonia of the Omega Men attempts unsuccessfully to betray her comrades to Lord Damyn. Blackfire presents the Citadel leaders with the captive X’Hal, just as the Titans attack to rescue Starfire. A standoff results when Cyborg threatens to kill Lord Damyn unless Komand’r surrenders. Blackfire resolves the situation by ruthlessly destroying Damyn herself and claiming the throne of the Citadel homeworld.

Notes:
>> This story continues into New Teen Titans Annual #1.


New Teen Titans Annual #1 [1982]
cover date: November 1982

Credits:
“War!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis:Starfire recovers and attacks her sister, beginning a new skirmish between Titans and aliens, until Lord Damyn’s Psion advisor takes control of the Citadel forces. He then pits Starfire against Blackfire in a duel to the death, ostensibly to decide Komand’r’s succession and the fate of Tamaran, although he secretly plans a double-cross. Meanwhile, aboard the Omega Men’s ship, Wonder Girl, Kid Flash, and Raven learn the origin of X’Hal from Primus and Kalista.

Once the greatest warrior of the Vegan system, X’Hal was primarily responsible for repelling a Psion invasion, and was therefore made the Vegans’ high priestess and ruler. The Psions returned, however, killing X’Hal and experimenting on her lifeless body, eventually converting it to pure energy, which unexpectedly brought her back to life as a powerful battle goddess. Destroying the attacking Psions, she then turned her uncontrolled power against her own people, destroying three of the twenty-five Vegan worlds.before she could be captured and brought under control by those who would later become the Warlords of Okaara.

On Tamaran’s surface, the death-duel results in Blackfire’s seeming demise, but triggers a series of explosions that will wipe out the Vegan system (as the Psion had planned), even as the other Titans and the Omega Men are reunited on the Citadel homeworld. Vega is saved only when X’Hal breaks free and detonates the explosives harmlessly. Raven heals the badly injured Starfire, after which Koriand’r is reunited briefly with her parents and brother before returning to Earth with her teammates.

Notes:
>> The story continues from New Teen Titans #25 and continues in New Teen Titans #26.
>> This issue includes pin-ups of Kid Flash, Robin, and Wonder Girl by George Perez.
>> Blackfire appears next in New Teen Titans (second series) #14.
>> Starfire is reunited with her family in this story; Myand’r, Luand’r, and Ryand’r (Starfire’s family), and other inhabitants of Tamaran – all last seen in flashbacks in New Teen Titans #3 and Tales of the New Teen Titans #4 – appear next in New Teen Titans (second series) #1.


New Teen Titans #26 [1982]
cover date: December 1982

Credits:
“Runaways”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis:The New Teen Titans return to Earth from the Vegan system, and Robin, having revealed his true feelings during the battle, begins a romantic relationship with Starfire. Several weeks pass uneventfully. Then, Dick and Kory, on a movie date. witness the accidental death of a drug-crazed youth who attacks D.A. Adrian Chase and his wife before running into the path of a car.

The next day, at the site of the Statue of Liberty, Changeling battles a young costumed girl, who calls herself Terra and possesses earth-moving powers, but she escapes him. At the same time, Raven and Cyborg encounter Lizzie Angelo, a teenage runaway, and take her to a youth center run by Ellie Corben. There they meet Adrian Chase, who enlists the aid of the Titans against drug smugglers. Returning to Cyborg’s apartment, the Titans discover a badly wounded teenage boy collapsed on the floor.

Notes:
>> First Appearance of Tara (Terra) Markov.
>> First Appearance of Captain Arthur Hall.


New Teen Titans #27 [1983]
cover date: January 1983

Credits:
“Runaways :Part II”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Raven heals the wounded youth at the cost of almost being taken over by the spirit of her demonic father, Trigon. The boy proves to be the older brother of the teenager whose death Dick and Kory had witnessed (in the previous issue). He had come to New York to investigate his brother’s death only to be set upon and nearly killed by gangsters employed by drug czar Anthony Scarapelli.

Returning to the youth center, the Titans meet with Adrian Chase and Roy Harper, the latter working as a liaison between federal and local authorities in drug-related cases. Leaving with the Titans, Roy resumes his identity as Speedy, and together the young heroes break up Scarapelli’s plans to have his new drug shipment distributed throughout the city by duped teenage runaways. Two of the youngsters, however, are killed in the melee, despite the Titans’ efforts.

Notes:
>> Speedy appears in this issue.
>> Captain Arthur Hall’s last name and rank revealed in this story.


New Teen Titans #28 [1983]
cover date: February 1983

Credits:
“Terra in the Night”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Over a span of several days, Changeling continues his pursuit of the fugitive Terra, finally capturing her and bringing her to the Titans Tower. Meanwhile, bases of Brother Blood’s cult are being systematically attacked and destroyed by the Brotherhood of Evil. Unaware of all this, the other Titans pursue their private lives: Dick and Kory continue their stormy romantic relationship; Donna meets Terry Long’s ex-wife and young daughter for the first time; and Wally tries to decide whether to quit the Titans in order to continue his college studies.

Kid Flash, Raven, and Cyborg are on hand when Changeling appears with Terra. After hearing how she had been forced to commit crimes by terrorists holding her parents, the rulers of the nation of Markovia, the Titans attack and subdue her tormentors, onlt to discover that the girl’s parents have long since been killed. Changeling befriends Terra in her grief, but the other Titans are still unsure whether to believe her story or not.

Notes:
>> First Appearance of Marcia Long, Terry Long’s ex-wife.
>> First Appearance of Jennifer “Jenny” Long, daughter of Marcia and Terry Long.


New Teen Titans #29 [1983]
cover date: March 1983

Credits:
“First Blood!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis:The conflict between the forces of Brother Blood and the Brotherhood of Evil continues, even as the Brotherhood makes its way to New York to kidnap Raven, whom they believe possesses knowledge that will enable them to overcome Blood. Back at Titans HQ, Dick grows more and more edgy as he inwardly attempts to come to terms with his identity as Robin, which in turn worries both Kory and Donna. Wally and Raven talk over their abortive relationship. Changeling continues his efforts to rehabilitate Terra, and all of these developments are watched with amused detachment by the visiting Speedy.

While Robin and Starfire go to visit Adrian Chase, who has a lead on Brother Blood, Frances Kane, again in possession of her unwanted magnetic powers, comes to Titans Tower to see Kid Flash. When the Brotherhood of Evil attacks, Speedy and Frances manage to stop them, but not before Phobia causes Raven to mistakenly attack and almost kill Kid Flash. Raven leaves the Titans because she cannot handle Kid Flash’s hatred.

Notes:
>> Frances Kane appears in this issue.
>> The Brotherhood of Evil returns with this issue.


New Teen Titans #30 [1983]
cover date: April 1983

Credits:
“First Blood!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: The Brotherhood of Evil overpowers Kid Flash, Speedy, and Frances Kane, and continues its pursuit of Raven. At the same time, Robin and Starfire accompany Adrian Chase to see Bethany Snow, who offers them information on Brother Blood in return for protection from reprisals (but in reality is still Blood’s loyal agent). Meanwhile, Terra adopts a new costume and decides to join the Teen Titans. Cyborg meets Mark Wright, a co-worker of Sarah Simms’s who claims to be her fiance. When Raven and the Brotherhood appear at the New Year’s Eve celebration in Times Square, the Titans, including Speedy, Terra, and Frances, confront them, but are unable to prevent Raven’s abduction. Terry Long proposes marriage to Donna Troy.

Notes:
>> Terra joins the Teen Titans this issue.
>> Terry Long proposes to Donna Troy in this issue.
>> First appearance of Mark Wright, Sarah Simms’s former co-worker and ex-boyfriend.


New Teen Titans #31 [1983]
cover date: May 1983

Credits:
“Inferno!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez (layouts)
Inker: Romeo Tanghal (finished art)
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Kid Flash is confused about his feelings for Raven, who is being tortured by the New Brotherhood of Evil; Wonder Girl returns to Titans Tower and gives the team news of Terry’s marriage proposal. The Titans leave for Zandia to locate Raven. The Brotherhood of Evil subjects Raven to psychological tortures to force her to reveal what she knows of Brother Blood (which knowledge she unconsciously absorbed when her soul-self enveloped Blood during their previous encounter), but it is only the subtler methods of the Brain and Monsieur Mallah that persuade her to cooperate. Trailing the evildoers to the site of Brother Blood’s secret “Regeneration Chamber,” the Titans find the tide of battle turning against them. When they appear to have been killed, Raven goes berserk and almost kills the villains, before Wonder Girl manages to bring her to her senses.

Notes:
>> none.


New Teen Titans #32 [1983]
cover date: June 1983

Credits:
“Thunder and Lightning!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez (layouts)
Inker: Romeo Tanghal (finished art)
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: When the Titans come back from Zandia, Frances Kane returns to Blue Valley, Speedy returns to his work as a government agent, and Robin leaves the Titans, placing Wonder Girl in charge; Speedy learns that there is trouble in St. Louis, MO, and the Titans go there and battle the reluctant Thunder and Lightning, who are searching for their father, who may hold the secret of controlling their devastating elemental powers.

Learning that Williams’s last known residence was in a Maine fishing village, the brothers go there, but are fought to a standstill by the Titans until Wonder Girl (through Wonder Woman’s Pentagon connections as Diana Prince) learns that their father has disappeared without a trace after a laboratory accident. Thunder and Lightning voluntarily surrender themselves to S.T.A.R. in hope of a cure, while the Titans vow to continue the search for Walter Williams.

Notes:
>> First Appearance of Thunder and Lightning (Gan and Tavis Williams).
>> Kid Flash has an adventure in Blue Valley in the second story in The Flash #325.


New Teen Titans #33 [1983]
cover date: July 1983

Credits:
“Who Killed Trident?”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez (layouts)
Inker: Romeo Tanghal (finished art)
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: The Teen Titans must solve a murder mystery without the aid of their resident detective, Robin, when a new super-villain called Trident is killed with his own weapon after three encounters with different groups of the Titans. Cyborg and Changeling had attempted to foil a robbery by the costumed criminal, who wielded a technologically gimmicked pitchfork; Raven and Wonder Girl had battled him at the Museum of Natural History; and Kid Flash and Terra had pursued him to a drive-in theater after a jewelry heist.

Starfire goes in search of Robin and learns that Jason Todd has replaced Dick Grayson as Batman’s partner. She then returns to her teammates and deduces that each Titans duo had faced a different criminal, each using the same costume and weapon. Cyborg is then able to trace the deceased Trident’s weapon to his two partners, who had killed him when he tried to withhold their shares of the loot. Even as the Titans defeat and capture the other two “Tridents,” Robin and Adrian Chase are staging a break in at the home of mob leader Anthony Scarapelli.

Notes:
>> First appearance of Trident.
>> Aqualad appears briefly in this story.


New Teen Titans #34 [1983]
cover date: August 1983

Credits:
“Endings… and Beginnings!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez (layouts)
Inker: Romeo Tanghal (finished art)
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis:The Titans surprise Terra with a birthday party, but she remains disgruntled that they have refused to share their secret identities with her since she joined the team. Robin becomes angry with Adrian Chase when the district attorney uses Robin’s status as a legal deputy to raid Anthony Scarapelli’s home in a possibly illegal manner. Kid Flash decides to leave the Titans to concentrate on college, Donna accepts Terry’s proposal, and Cyborg remains unhappy at having learned that Sarah is engaged, unaware that Mark Wright had misrepresented himself as her fiancee.

All of these developments are put aside, however, when the Terminator returns to challenge the team, and Terra determines to prove her worth by battling him alone. Although the other Titans join the fight, and although the villain ultimately escapes, Terra is unquestionably the heroine of the battle, and the Titans decide to share their secrets with her at their next meeting. That night, Terra meets with the Terminator at her apartment. Unsuspected by the Titans, she has been the Terminator’s partner from the beginning, planted in the group as a double agent to betray them. Meanwhile, moments after Robin leaves Adrian Chase’s home, the district attorney’s apartment building is rocked by an explosion.

Notes:
>> Donna troy accepts Terry’s marriage proposal this issue.
>> First Appearance of Adeline Wilson, Deathstroke’s ex-wife (in portrait only).
>> First Appearance of Joseph Wilson, Deathstroke’s son (in portrait only).
>> Terra celebrates her 16th birthday this issue.
>> Terra revealed as a traitor, working with Deathstroke, this issue.
>> Deathstroke the Terminator and Wintergreen last seen in New Teen Titans #10.
>> The story is continued in New Teen Titans Annual #2.


New Teen Titans Annual #2 [1983]
cover date: 1982

Credits:
“The Murder Machine”
Co-plotter, Scripter: Marv Wolfman
Co-plotter, Penciller: George Pérez (layouts only)
Inker: Pablo Marcos (finished art)
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Adrian Chase and his family are rushed to Mercy Hospital after the firebombing of their apartment. Although declared clinically dead for seven minutes before being resuscitated, Chase survives, but his wife and children are killed. Anthony Scarapelli, who is responsible for the attack, is scheduled to be “disciplined” for his unwise actions by his Mafia superior, Donna Omicidlo. Despite a court order to the contrary, Robin begins a campaign of harassment against the mob leader. Though they have misgivings about his attitude and methods, the other Teen Titans agree to help Robin prove Scarapelli’s guilt, and they begin raiding the sites of his various illegal enterprises.

Panicked, Scarapelli calls on the aid of the Monitor, who provides him with six super-powered assassins (Scorcher, Spear, Bazooka, Slasher, Tanker, and Cheshire) to use against the Titans, and troops to protect him from the Mafia godmother. In a deadly warehouse battle between the Titans and the assassins, the young heroes survive only with the unseen aid of a mysterious figure, who saves the lives of Changeling and Kid Flash by killing their assailants, Slasher and Scorcher. The wounded Changeling, and Kid Flash, who was saved from death at Cheshire’s hands by Raven, are sidelined, but Robin, using information on a tape sent to him by Chase, continues with his plan. The Titans intervene to prevent Scarapelli’s Monitor-provided troops from wiping out Donna Omicidio and her men.

Robin himself goes to Scarapelli’s home, where the mobster, about to flee the country, has been attacked by the mystery man from the warehouse fight. This costumed avenger, who calls himself the Vigilante, proves to be Adrian Chase in a new identity. When Robin confronts Chase, Scarapelli pulls a gun and shoots both Robin and Vigilante a split-second before Chase returns fire. The police arrive to find Scarapelli dead, Robin wounded, and no sign of Scarapelli’s assailant. Robin decides to remain silent regarding the Vigilante and his true identity.

Notes:
>> The story continues from New Teen Titans #34.
>> First appearance of Adrian Chase as The Vigilante.
>> First appearance of Cheshire; serves as one of Monitor’s troops; appears next in Tales of the New Teen Titans #51.
>> First appearance of The Scorcher; serves as one of Monitor’s troops; dies in this story.
>> First appearance of Slasher; serves as one of Monitor’s troops; dies in this story.
>> First appearance of Spear ; serves as one of Monitor’s troops.
>> First appearance of Bazooka; serves as one of Monitor’s troops.
>> First appearance of Tanker; serves as one of Monitor’s troops.


New Teen Titans #35 [1983]
cover date: October 1983

Credits:
“Siege!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: Keith Pollard (layouts only)
Inker: Romeo Tanghal (finished art)
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Sarah Simms is accosted on the street by Mark Wright, who insanely persists in claiming to be her fiance after she has told him repeatedly that they were never more than friends and co-workers. When a police officer intervenes in their altercation, Mark attacks him and takes his weapon. Now armed and raving, he drags Sarah into a nearby sporting goods store, which he takes over at gunpoint, wounding a cashier who tries to stop him. Using a rifle from the store merchandise, Mark holds off the police, who surround the shop, while Sarah takes advantage of his distraction to place a whispered phone call to Titans Tower.

Cyborg, Changeling, and Raven, the only Titans on hand at the moment, arrive almost immediately, but their initial efforts to enter the store and disarm Mark meet with failure. While Changeling talks to the police, Raven teleports inside and tries to calm Mark, while Cyborg uses a finger-laser to enter the building through the ceiling. Finally, confused and surrounded, Mark puts down his weapon and collapses into Raven’s arms.

Notes:
>> This story only features Cyborg, Changeling, and Raven.
>> The Changeling teams up with Captain Carrot and the Zoo Crew to battle Super-Gorilla Grodd in Captain Ca,rot and His Amazing Zoo Crew #20 following this story.
>> Then the Teen Titans team up with Superman and the Justice League of America to battle Brainiac in Action Comics #546.


New Teen Titans #36 [1983]
cover date: November 1983

Credits:
“Siege!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: Keith Pollard (layouts only)
Inker: Romeo Tanghal (finished art)
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis:The Teen Titans are assembled at S.T.A.R. labs, where Dr. Jenet Klyburn is attempting unsuccessfully to cure Thunder and Lightning of their unwanted powers. Kid Flash and Robin are both considering quitting the Titans. When the S.T.A.R. machinery explodes from an energy over-load, a brief and senseless battle ensues between the twin brothers and the Titans, until Raven, despite the danger to herself, offers to use her soul-self to learn the whereabouts of their missing father.

Thus it is revealed that the man who called himself Walter Williams was actually an extraterrestrial being who had been the sole survivor of a crash-landing on Earth six hundred years ago, and who had returned to Viet Nam, the site of the crash, in the guise of an American soldier, to retrieve his spaceship. Almost killed when he accidentally triggered the ship’s security devices, he made his way back to American-held territory, where he met and shared a romance with the Vietnamese woman who became the mother of Gan and Tavis. Discovering his present whereabouts, Thunder and Lightning, together with the Titans, find their alien father a prisoner of the HIVE, who have been exploiting his powers for their own ends for years. Under the HIVE’s control, the alien attacks the heroes, ultimately forcing Thunder and Lightning to slay their own father. Using the deceased extraterrestrial’s blood, S.T.A.R. scientists are able to cure Thunder and Lightning, allowing them to control their powers, after which the brothers return to their mother’s homeland.

Notes:
>> Origin of Thunder and Lightning revealed.


New Teen Titans #37 [1983]
cover date: December 1983

Credits:
“Light’s Out, Everyone!”
Co-plotter, Scripter: Marv Wolfman
Co-plotter, Penciller: George Pérez (layouts only)
Inker: Romeo Tanghal (finished art)
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis, New Teen Titans #37: Fearsome Five member Gizmo breaks his villain group out of prison; Under Psimon’s leadership, the Fearsome Five kidnap Dr. Helga Jace and force her to make them a group of Mud Men to help in their battles; Dick Grayson tells Bruce Wayne that he wants to terminate their heroic partnership; The Titans and the Outsiders team up to defeat the Fearsome Five after the villains expel Dr. Light from the group and attempt to kill him; Robin chafes under Batman’s leading the two groups in battle and takes over, proving that Robin does not always have to be in Batman’s shadow.

Synopsis, Batman and the Outsiders #5: The story concludes in Batman and the Outsiders #5, in which the Fearsome Five and their creatures are defeated through the teamwork of the Teen Titans and the Outsiders, and Batman and Robin resolve their differences as Robin proves to be the more experienced and capable team leader.

Notes:
>> Story continues in Batman & The Outsiders #5.
>> The cover of this issue and the cover of Batman and the Outsiders #5 combine to form a single illustration of the battle among the Teen Titans, the Outsiders, the Fearsome Five, and the Mud Pack.
>> Origins of Mammoth and Shimmer revealed in this story.
>> Robin, Wonder Girl, Cyborg, and Starfire meet with Captain Arthur Hall in The Vigilante #3, after which Cyborg encounters the Vigilante in the same story.


New Teen Titans #38 [1984]
cover date: January 1984

Credits:
“Who is Donna Troy?”
Co-plotter, Scripter: Marv Wolfman
Co-plotter, Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Rescued from a burning apartment building as an infant by Woman Woman and raised by Queen Hippolyta on Paradise Island, Donna (Wonder Girl) Troy has never known her true identity. Now, with their wedding in the offing, Terry Long asks Robin to investigate the secret of Donna’s unknown past. At the site of the fire-gutted building, Robin finds a child’s doll which Donna vaguely remembers. Subjecting the doll to chemical and computer analysis, he traces it to a kindly old toy shop owner who had once repaired it for a Mrs. Cassiday of Willowbrook Orphanage in Virginia.

Locating Mrs. Cassiday in a nursing home in Florida, Dick brings Donna to meet her, and they learn that Donna’s mother had brought her to the orphanage when she learned she was dying of cancer. Donna was then adopted by a couple named Stacey. Returning to Virginia, they find the former Mrs. Fay Stacey, now remarried as Fay Evans, and foster mother and daughter are tearfully reunited.

Dick and Donna then learn that, two years after Donna’s adoption, her foster father had been killed in an accident, and his wife, penniless, had been forced to give Donna up for readoption. Donna is satisfied at this, but Robin investigates further and discovers that the couple who died in the apartment building fire had not adopted Donna, but were go-betweens for a child-selling scheme run by a crooked lawyer. Finally aware of her past, Donna visits the grave of her natural mother, Dorothy Hinckley.

Notes:
>> Donna Troy’s past is revealed this issue.
>> First appearance of Elmira Cassiday, former proprietor of Willowbrook Orphanage; appears next in Tales of the Teen Titans #50.
>> First appearance of Dorothy Hinckley, Donna Troy’s natural mother; appears in flashback only; dies of cancer behind the scenes in flashback.
>> First appearance of Fay Stacey Evans, Donna Troy’s adoptive mother, and her family (husband Hank and children Jerry and Cindy); all appear next in Tales of the Teen Titans #50.


New Teen Titans #39 [1984]
cover date: February 1984

Credits:
“Crossroads”
Co-plotter, Scripter: Marv Wolfman
Co-plotter, Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: George Pérez
Editor: Len Wein, Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Acting on information provided by Bethany Snow, the Teen Titans invade an Alaskan way station of Brother Blood’s cult, and find proof of his political backing of certain senators and congressmen, which they turn over to the authorities. Terra secretly reports the Titans’ activities to the Terminator, and she and the Terminator fight a mock battle to test each other’s powers.

At the next Titans meeting, Kid Flash appears in civilian garb as Wally West and formally announces that he is leaving the team. After goodbyes are said, Robin unexpectedly announces that he too is giving up his costumed identity – not because he is retiring, as Kid Flash is, but because he intends to take on a new guise, as yet undecided, which will identify him more as the Titans’ leader than as the Batman’s junior partner. Unknown to the Titans, all of this information is being relayed to the Terminator by Terra, so that he too now knows Robin and Kid Flash’s true identities.

Notes:
>> Last appearance of Dick Grayson as Robin; appears next in Batman #368, in which he passes on his Robin costume and identity to Jason Todd, who becomes the new Robin.
>> Wally West gives up his costumed identity and resigns from the Teen Titans in this story; appears next, as Wally West, in Tales of the Teen Titans #45.
>> While Robin is visiting Batman and Jason Todd in Batman #368 following this story, the other Teen Titans encounter the Vanguard, team up with Superman, and battle Brainiac in the flashback in New Teen Titans Annual (second series) #1.


New Teen Titans #40 [1984]
cover date: March 1984

Credits:
“Lifeblood!”
Co-plotter, Scripter: Marv Wolfman
Co-plotter, Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal and George Perez
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: In Zandia, an awestruck group of acolytes are witnesses to an astonishing ritual in which Brother Blood rises from a huge pool formed by the collected blood of his deceased enemies.

Meanwhile, at Steve Dayton’s estate on Long Island, the antics of Gar Logan and Tara Markov cause the latest in a series of tutors hired by Dayton to quit, whereupon the two youngest Titans fly to join their teammates as guests on a segment of Bethany Snow’s cable TV program regarding a proposed arms shipment to Zandia. The Titans, led by Wonder Girl, are unable to convince their audience of the true evil intentions of the charismatic Brother Blood. Dick Grayson deduces that the newly elected congressmen and senators who appeared on the program in support of Blood are actually his followers, rather than the politicians whose seeming affiliation with the villain had been revealed by the Titans’ investigations (in the previous issue).

Disguised as newsman Joe Walsh, Dick accompanies Bethany Snow and the three discredited politicians on a fact-finding tour to Zandia, only to have his true identity uncovered by Blood’s cult. Receiving an emergency signal from Dick, the other Titans invade Blood’s temple in their T-Sub, but are overcome by a surprise gas attack. The captive Titans awaken to find Dick under Brother Blood’s control and themselves about to be lowered into his pool of blood.

Notes:
>> none


Tales of the Teen Titans #41 [1984]
cover date: April 1984

Credits:
“Baptism of Blood!”
Co-plotter, Scripter: Marv Wolfman
Co-plotter, Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal (finished art)
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: While Raven’s soul-self distracts Brother Blood, Terra uses her earth-powers to free the Teen Titans. After they battle and defeat his monstrous creatures, Blood offers to meet the Titans in personal combat. Instead, he attacks them with robots and missiles, which the Titans manage to repel. An explosive holographic image of the villain, however, dispatches all the Titans but Raven and Cyborg, whom Blood himself easily defeats.

Even as Zandian President Marko declares a state of war between his government and Brother Blood’s church, Blood orders a mind-controlled Dick Grayson to activate a laser cannon which will kill his six teammates. Starfire’s protestations of love for him enable Dick to break free of his trance and release the Titans. Before Brother Blood can act, President Marko’s forces attack, bringing his temple down around his ears and causing the laser cannon to collapse, seemingly crushing the villain.

The Titans escape the holocaust, but with Blood an apparent martyr, belief in his cult flourishes and world governments condemn the regime of Marko, his political enemy.

Notes:
>> Title changes to Tales of the Teen Titans with this issue, as The New Teen Titans (second series) begins simultaneous publication, with issue #1 of the new series appearing concurrently with issue #45 of this series.
>> The New Teen Titans are briefly drawn into the events involving Superman, Batman, the Justice League of America, the Outsiders, and the Pantheon in World’s Finest Comics #300, following this story. The 4-page segment is drawn by George Pérez.
>> The Titans (except Dick Grayson and Raven) attend the celebration of the anniversary of Supergirl’s arrival on Earth in Supergirl #20.


Tales of the Teen Titans #42 [1984]
cover date: May 1984

Credits:
“The Judas Contract: Book One: The Eyes of Tara Markov”
Co-plotter, Scripter: Marv Wolfman
Co-plotter, Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Dick Giordano
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Visiting Donna’s photography studio where Kory is modeling, Tara Markov is allowed to learn Wonder Girl and Starfire’s secret identities. Later, at Donna and Kory’s apartment, the group plans Terry and Donna’s upcoming wedding: Gar offers the use of Steve Dayton’s estate as a wedding site, and Donna asks Tara to replace the reluctant Raven as a bridesmaid, and Dick to give her away.

From there, Gar and Tara go to watch the unsuccessful attempt of Sarah Simnis and her students to teach Cyborg to skate, and Cyborg, returning to his apartment, receives a telegram announcing the return of his world-traveling grandparents. Leaving Vic, Gar and Tara share a romantic moment before Tara returns to Titans Tower, where she has a brief but ominous discussion with Raven.

The next day, the Titans stage a workout at their headquarters: Cyborg matches his strength against a magnetic testing device; Wonder Girl and Starfire fight a duel with staffs; and Changeling and Terra engage in a mock battle. When Changeling humiliates and antagonizes her, Terra completely loses her temper and counterattacks with her full power, almost killing him. She manages to excuse her violent behavior. She later reports the Titans’ identities and activities to the Terminator. As the Terminator and his aide, Wintergreen, leave with Terra to put their plan to capture the Titans into motion, they are unaware that they are being observed from afar.

Notes:
>> First appearance of Joe Wilson.
>> First appearance of Adeline Kane Wilson.


Tales of the Teen Titans #43 [1984]
cover date: June 1984

Credits:
“The Judas Contract: Book 2: Betrayal!”
Co-plotter, Scripter: Marv Wolfman
Co-plotter, Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Mike DeCarlo, Dick Giordano
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Dick Grayson is astounded when the Terminator, obviously aware of Dick’s former costumed identity, attacks the Titans’ leader in his own apartment. Dick manages to escape and tries to summon the Titans to his aid, but there is no response to his emergency signal. The Terminator tracks Dick the best he can but eventually loses him, unaware that he himself is being followed by the woman and young man who had been watching him previously.

Arriving at Dick and Kory’s apartment, Dick finds the place in shambles, with evidence that Kory had been overcome by an explosive package delivered to her with Dick’s name on it. At Donna’s studio, he deduces that she had been rendered unconscious by a toxic ether created from her own photographic chemicals. Borrowing Donna’s car, Dick arrives at Victor’s apartment, where Victor had been the victim of an electrically charged chair. There is no trace of any of the defeated Titans, and Dick has no way of knowing if the Titans have been killed or simply kidnapped. Also, all the attacks indicate that the Terminator is aware of all of the Titans’ true identities, and Dick cannot fathom how terminator gained that information.

Finally returning to the Tower, he had just found evidence of a battle involving Terra when he is surprised by the entrance of Adeline Wilson and her son Joseph, the people who had been shadowing the Terminator. They also know who Dick had been, and tell im that Terra had been Terminator’s agent the whole time, and that it was Terra who had defeated Raven. Unconvinced, Dick tries to get a hold of Gar Logan by calling him, only to find that he has fallen to the Terminator. Mailing out autographed photographs of himself supposedly requeted by his female fans, he was drugged by the glue on the envelopes.

As Adeline reveals that she is Slade Wilson’s ex-wife, the Terminator arrives at H.I.V.E. headquarters in the Rocky Mountains with his captives.

Notes:
>> none


Tales of the Teen Titans #44 [1984]
cover date: July 1984

Credits:
“The Judas Contract: Book 3: There Shall Come a Titan”
Co-plotter, Scripter: Marv Wolfman
Co-plotter, Penciller: George Pérez (layouts)
Inker: Mike DeCarlo, Dick Giordano (finished art)
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: To convince him of the truth of her assertions, Adeline Wilson tells Dick Grayson the origin of the Terminator. In the early 1960s, Major Slade Joseph Wilson, a former Korean War hero, joined the special U.S. Army training course headed by Captain Adeline Kane. He proved her most apt pupil, and she took him aside for special additional training. A year later, he graduated from the course with honors and was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel. Adeline met British Army Major Wintergreen, seemingly Wilson’s only friend, although she never learned the nature of the bond between the two men. A romance blossomed, and Slade and Adeline were married six months later.

Slade served in Vietnam, while Adeline gave birth to their son, Grant. Then Slade volunteered for an experiment in resisting truth serums using a drug designed to stimulate the adrenal gland. The experiment went wrong, and a seemingly disabled Wilson was stricken from the active duty roster. Some time later, the Wilsons’ second son, Joseph, was born. Then, defying orders in order to rescue Wintergreen, who had been taken captive in Viet Nam, Slade was discharged by the Army. Restless, he became a renowned safari hunter, while rearing his two sons, Grant, who followed in his parents’ military footsteps, and Joseph, who excelled in music and art.

One night while Slade was away, Adeline was attacked in their home and Joseph was kidnapped. Returning home, Slade revealed to his wife that he had been granted superhuman powers by the drug experiment which had seemed to disable him, and that he had used those powers to begin a secret career as Deathstroke the Terminator, an international mercenary assassin. In Tangiers, Terminator and Adeline confronted the terrorists who had captured Joseph in order to force Deathstroke to reveal the identity of his latest client. Rather than betray his employer, Terminator gambled on his superhuman speed to rescue his son before his captor could cut the boy’s throat. Joseph was saved, but the throat wound he received cost him the use of his voice. Furious with her husband, Adeline attempted to kill him, but succeeded only in shooting out his right eye. The couple then divorced, and much later, their son Grant died battling the Titans as the Ravager.

As Adeline concludes her story, she reveals that she knows the whereabouts of the Terminator and his captives. Dick then assumes his new costumed identity as Nightwing for the first time. Returning to the others, he finds Joseph Wilson in costume as Jericho. Born a mutant due to the genetic side-effects of the chemicals that gave his father powers, Joe Wilson is able to possess the body of an opponent and usurp his will, an ability he demonstrates by using it on Nightwing. Convinced of Jericho’s sincerity, Nlghtwing allows him to join him in his attempt to rescue the Titans.

Notes:
>> First appearance of Dick Grayson as Nightwing.
>> First appearance of Joseph Wilson as Jericho.
>> Origin and background of Deathstroke, The Terminator revealed this issue.
>> Origin of Jericho revealed in this story; powers revealed.
>> Backgrounds and origins of Wintergreen and Adeline Kane also revealed in this story.
>> Slade’s rival, Bill Walsh, appears in flashback; Later becomes the second Ravager in Deathstroke #1-4.
>> The story continues in Tales of the Teen Titans Annual #3.


Tales of the Teen Titans Annual #3 [1984]
cover date: 1984

Credits:
“The Judas Contract: Part 4: The Finale!”
Co-plotter, Scripter: Marv Wolfman
Co-plotter, Penciller: George Pérez (layouts)
Inker: Mike DeCarlo, Dick Giordano (finished art)
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Held captive by the H.I.V.E. in an Enervator, which uses their own powers to hold them helpless, the Titans are shocked at the Terminator’s revelation that Terra is his partner. Meanwhile, Nightwing and Jericho attempt to breach the criminal organization’s headquarters, and Adeline Wilson keeps Wintergreen from aiding the Terminator.

Wintergreen then reveals to her the origin of his relationship with Slade Wilson. He and the future Terminator had served together under a General Sampson, who ordered Wilson to lead what Wintergreen regarded as a suicide mission. Wilson survived the mission only because Wintergreen defied orders in order to save his life. When Wintergreen again found himself under Sampson’s command in Vietnam, the general deliberately assigned him to a similarly deadly mission, which resulted in his capture by the enemy. Slade Wilson returned the earlier favor by using his special powers and costumed identity to rescue his friend.

Jericho’s powers of possession enable him and Nightwing to penetrate to the heart of the H.I.V.E. stronghold, but they are overpowered and captured when they unexpectedly encounter Terra. The acquisition of Nightwing, whom they recognize as the former Robin, completes the roster of the Titans and fulfills the Terminator’s contract, but when he realizes that his son will share the Titans’ fate, the Terminator bargains for Jericho’s release.

Jericho abruptly regains consciousness and possesses his father, causing him to free the Titans from the Enervator. Believing that the Terminator has betrayed her, Terra attacks him. In the ensuing confusion, the Titans defeat the assembled H.I.V.E. agents, and Jericho releases the Terminator from his power to allow him to defend himself. A three-way conflict then erupts among the Titans, Terra, and the Terminator. Raven attempts to stop Terra with her mental powers, while Jericho breaks a standoff between the Terminator and the Titans, downing the villain.

Then Terra breaks free of Raven’s influence, and her last semblance of sanity vanishes. In a mad rage, she uses her full power – demolishing the entire complex and bringing the wreckage down on herself. Digging frantically, the Changeling at last finds Terra’s lifeless body. The next day, a small funeral service is held, attended by the Titans, the Outsiders, Batman and Robin, Terry Long, and Dr. Jace.

Notes:
>> Origin and background of Deathstroke, The Terminator revealed this issue.
>> Backgrounds and origins of Wintergreen and Adeline Kane also revealed in this story.
>> Death of Terra.


Tales of the Teen Titans #45 [1984]
cover date: August 1984

Credits:
Co-plotter, Scripter: Marv Wolfman
Co-plotter, Penciller: George Pérez (layouts)
Inker: Mike DeCarlo (finished art)
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Late one evening when the Titans Tower is deserted, Aqualad and Aquagirl arrive both on the verge of death for lack of fresh water. They are saved only by the timely visit of a visiting Wally West and Frances Kane. At the same time, a gang of gunrunners is attacked by the Changeling, who has been driven to distraction by Terra’s betrayal and death, and only the intervention of Cyborg prevents him from killing his opponents.

While the two heroes are occupied Victor’s grandparents arrive at his empty apartment, and a female caller finds Gar absent from the Dayton estate. Meanwhile, Dick Grayson and Terry Long attend a bachelor party thrown by Terry’s brother. Wonder Girl and Starfire visit Paradise Island to secure Queen Hippolyta’s permission for Donna’s marriage, and Joe Wilson accompanies Raven home from a late college class.

When the Titans, (except Cyborg and Changeling) assemble at their headquarters, Wally rebukes them for not informing them of Terra’s death, but the imperiled Aqualad and Aquagirl take precedence over this painful discussion. Reviving, they relate how they barely escaped an attack on Atlantis by the forces of H.I.V.E. The Titans decide that the time has come to take the offensive against their longtime foes, and when Wally declines to join them, Jericho instead accompanies Nightwing, Wonder Girl, Starfire, Raven, and the two Atlanteans on their mission.

Notes:
>> Aqualad and Aquagirl guest-star.
>> Aqualad’s give name, Garth, is revealed this issue.
>> Aqualad was last seen in New Teen Titans #33.
>> Aquagirl was last seen in Adventure Comics #450; mentioned as having “belonged to the Titans several years ago” in this story, implying an untold Story in which Aquagirl previously met and joined the Teen Titans.
>> First appearance of Tucker Stone and Maude Stone, Victor Stone’s paternal grandparents; first mentioned in issue #42.
>> Return of Jillian Jackson, Gar’s girlfriend (last seen in flashback in Tales of the New Teen Titans #3); face and identity not revealed; appears next in issue #47.


Tales of the Teen Titans #46 [1984]
cover date: September 1984

Credits:
“Showdown!”
Co-plotter, Scripter: Marv Wolfman
Co-plotter, Penciller: George Pérez (layouts)
Inker: Mike DeCarlo (finished art)
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: When the Titans attack the H.I.V.E.’s undersea base in their T-Sub, counterattacks are mounted against them at the orders of the H.I.V.E. leader, a woman who is apparently the widow of the late organizer of the criminal combine. Aquagirl is the first to penetrate the base,only to be blasted by H.I.V.E. troops. Sensing Tula’s distress, Raven teleports into the midst of their enemies and, unleashing a burst of Trigon-like power, nearly destroys her attackers before she comes to her senses.

Back in New York Cyborg confronts his grandparents, finally making his peace with them after expressing his anger at their missing his father’s funeral, while Changeling continues to stalk the streets attacking criminals. At the H.I.V.E. base, an exhausted Raven stays behind to guard the sub, while the others fight their way to the central chamber. As soon as they enter the room, the H.I.V.E. mistress seals them in, ejecting the entire chamber from the base and blows it up.

Notes:
>> First appearance of H.I.V.E. Mistress.


Tales of the Teen Titans #47 [1984]
cover date: October 1984

Credits:
“Final Conflict!”
Co-plotter, Scripter: Marv Wolfman
Co-plotter, Penciller: George Pérez (layouts)
Inker: Mike DeCarlo (finished art)
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Raven manages to enclose the Teen Titans in her soulself in time to protect them from the explosion of the H.I.V.E. trap. Aqualad and Aquagirl then lead the counterattack that breaches their enemies’ defense. Terribly weakened by her effort, Raven teleports away to recuperate, while a H.I.V.E. member whom Jericho possessed offers information to help the Titans.

At Titans Tower, a discussion between Cyborg and Changeling about the latter’s behavior since Terra’s death is interrupted by the arrival of Jillian Jackson, Gar’s former girlfriend, (who had been trying to call him in the previous 2 issues), newly returned from a British finishing school… with pink hair.

In the H.I.V.E. base, Nightwing and Aqualad accompany the H.I.V.E. turncoat to the Power Center while the other Titans take on costumed troopers. When Starfire is knocked out, Jericho possesses her and leads the other female Titans through a wall of flame. Sensing defeat, the H.I.V.E. mistress launches a missle to destroy nearby Atlantis, but Aqualad manages to change its course by riding on top of it before it explodes.

Reaching the their foes’ main council chamber, the Titans find the mistress and all her lieutenants dead at her own hand. A videotape recording reveals H.I.V.E.’s master plan to poison the oceans and blackmail the globe, but Wonder Girl suspects that it is merely a ruse to delay the heroes. The Titans escape in their sub as the complex explodes.

Notes:
>> First appearance of H.I.V.E. Mistress.
>> The end of the first H.I.V.E. incarnation.
>> Jillian Jackson returns to Gar’s life this issue, having dyed her hair pink.


Tales of the Teen Titans #48 [1984]
cover date: November 1984

Credits:
“The Recombatants”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: Steve Rude, George Pérez (pages 19-24)
Inker: Al Gordon, Mike DeCarlo (pages 19-24)
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: At Dayton Labs in Nevada, scientists have created artificial intelligent life in the form of four super-powered humanoids: Aurora, who can create realistic illusions; Dreadnaught, who possesses super-strength; Topz, who control magnetism; and Psuedos, who is a shape-changer. Learning that they are slated for destruction by their creators, the Recombatants escape into the streets of Las Vegas, where the Titans are summoned to battle them.

After an inconclusive skirmish, the two teams agree to return to the lab together. Revealing that Aurora accidentally caused two men to suffer fatal heart attacks during the Recombatants’ escape, the scientists declare that the four artificial beings must be destroyed, but the Titans defy them. In the confusion, the Recombatants flee. Realizing that they will never be allowed to live normal lives, they deliberately blow up the lab’s central core, preventing the further creation of artificial life, and destroying themselves in the process.

Meanwhile, back in New York, Gar Logan begins planning Donna Troy and Terry Long’s wedding celebration at Dayton Estates, and Terry recieves some unexpected wedding presents from his students. After the Titans return from their mission, Joe Wilson attempts unsuccessfully to help the stricken Raven.

Notes:
>> First appearance of The Recombatants (Aurora, Dreadnaught, Topaz, and Pseudos); characters patterned on Rainbow, Tank, Amber and Sham of Eclipse Comics’s DNAgents; all die in this story.
>> Published almost simultaneously with this story of a battle between the New Teen Titans and the Recombatants, who resemble the DNAgents, is a story of a battle between the DNAgents and Project: Youngblood, a team of heroes who resemble the New Teen Titans, in DNAgents #14, produced by Eclipse Comics.


Tales of the Teen Titans #49 [1984]
cover date: December 1984

Credits:
“The Light that Failed”
Co-plotter, Scripter: Marv Wolfman
Co-plotter, Penciller: George Pérez, Carmine Infantino (pages 6-21)
Inker: Al Gordon, Mike DeCarlo
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: The Teen Titans, their friends, and Terry Long’s family prepare for Terry and Donna’s wedding ceremony the following day. In Central City, Wally West and Frances Kane witness a bank robery staged by Dr. Light. Although the use of his super-speed now causes him extreme pain, and he suspects that his powers may be killing him, Wally insists on going into action, albeit invisibly, to stop the super-villain.

When Wally is injured, Frances uses her magnetic powers to defeat Light, and the police arrest him. Humiliated at being beaten by a foe he never even saw, Dr. Light swears to give up his criminal career. Wally and Frances then meet up with the Flash, who confirms the diagnosis that the affects of the accident that created Kid Flash on Wally’s changing adolescent body chemistry is responsible for his seemingly fatal illness, for which there is no known cure. Despite his despair, Wally phones to confirm his attendance at Donna’s wedding.

Notes:
>> Lilith Clay appears, last seen Teen Titans #52.
>> Sharon Tracy appears, last seen in Teen Titans #29.


Tales of the Teen Titans #50 [1985]
cover date: February 1985

Credits:
“We Are Gathered Here Today…”
Co-plotter, Scripter: Marv Wolfman
Co-plotter, Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Mike DeCarlo, Dick Giordano
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: It is Terry and Donna’s wedding day, and at Dayton Estates, a besieged Gar Logan frantically supervises the preparations. Of those invited, only Raven, slowly being overcome by evil urges after overextending her powers, is unable to attend. The ceremony begins as Dick Grayson leads the bride-to-be to the altar. Terry and Donna recite their vows and are officially joined in wedlock.

Gar then introduces the wedding party and hosts the reception. Among the attendees, in civilian guise, are most of the present and former members of the Titans, as well as Clark Kent, Lana Lang, and Bruce Wayne. Cyborg is mystified when no one comments on his robotic appearance or on the unexplained presence of a known Teen Titan at the wedding, until Changeling reveals that his adoptive father, Mento, has used his powers to make all the guests see Cyborg as plain Victor Stone.

Donna and Terry are puzzled when they are summoned to an upstairs room, where they are greeted by Queen Hippolyta, who had prayed to the goddess Athena for permission to leave Paradise Island to attend her daughter’s wedding. Later, Sharon Tracy and Joe Wilson catch the thrown bridal bouquet and garter, respectively, and as the reception breaks up, the Titans present Gar Logan with a special medal in honor of his catering services. Finally, Terry and Donna leave on Steve Dayton’s private jet for their honeymoon in Greece.

Notes:
>> Marriage of Donna Troy and Terry Long.
>> Titans attending: Dick Grayson, Wally West, Gar Logan, Starfire, Vic Stone, Garth & Tula (last seen in issue #47), Roy Harper (last seen, as Speedy, in The New Teen Titans (Drug Awareness Giveaway) #1), Hank Hall and Don Hall (last seen, as the Hawk and the Dove, in The Brave and the Bold #181), Mal Duncan and Karen Beecher Duncan (both last seen in Superman Family #191), Betty Kane (last seen, as Bat-Girl, in Batman Family #16), Charley Parker (last seen, as Golden Eagle, in Teen Titans #52), Duela Dent (last appeared in Detective Comics #483).
>> Gnarrk revealed to have died in this story.
>> Mal Duncan and Karen Beecher Duncan revealed to have married in this story.
>> Duela Dent reveals she was too young to have ever been Two-Face’s daughter; Real father unrevealed.
>> Hawk & Dove last appeared in The Brave and the Bold #181, where they are shown to have aged into their late 20s, which is impossible given the Titans’ ages remaining younger; A wedding guest states, “Boy, I thought you guys were older,” a joking reference to the continuity gaffe.
>> Bridal Gowns desiged by Carol Flynn, wife of George Pérez.
>> Wedding guests Lucy, Tina, Mercy, and Margie are named for members of TitanTalk APA.
>> Wedding photographers Joe Richani, Janet, and Doug are named for members of TitanTalk APA.
>> Other attendees: Dabney Everly, Anthony Tollin, Mike DeCarlo, Michele Wolfman, Jessica Wolfman (daughter of Marv and Michele), Carol Flynn, Steve Montano, Gary Martin, Len Wein, Todd Klein, Rob Liefeld, Pat Bastienne, Dick Giordano, Romeo Tanghal, John Costanza, Sam Sanders, Bob Greenberger, and others (no physical appearance; all signed the guest list; most are staff members of DC Comics Inc.


Tales of the Teen Titans #51 [1985]
cover date: March 1985

Credits:
“The Jericho Imbroglio”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: Rich Buckler
Inker: Bob Smith (finished art)
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: The Teen Titans, aided by Lilith, defeat a gang of gun-runners in the employ of President Marlo of Qurac. The next day, MarIo hires Cheshire, who abducts Adeline Wilson, Jericho’s mother, a former agent of his who had stolen information on the military strength of Kyran, a bordering nation which he intends to invade.

Meanwhile, Pentagon officials inform Nightwing that Joe and Adeline Wilson are wanted for questioning by Interpol. When Nightwing tells Changeling of this, Gar, already suspicious of Joe, attempts to arrest him. Jericho, anxious to pursue his mother’s kidnapper and unable to make Changeling listen, defeats Gar and escapes. At the same time, S.T.A.R. scientists discover an alien spaceship and its pilot frozen in the ice in Alaska.

Notes:
>> Lilith Clay rejoins the Teen Titans and becomes Kory Anders’s roommate in this story.
>> First mention of Searchers, Inc.
>> Chesire reveals that she has borne the child of one of the Teen Titans in this story.
>> First appearance of Azrael, incased in ice (real name unknown; given the name Azrael by Mother Mayhem in New Teen Titans (second series) #12).


Tales of the Teen Titans #52 [1985]
cover date: April 1985

Credits:
“Jericho’s Story”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: Rich Buckler
Inker: Mike DeCarlo (finished art)
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: While President Mario arranges to replace the arms lost when his gunrunners were apprehended, Jericho travels to Qurac with one of his mother’s agents, a young woman named Amber, to rescue Adeline. Over Changeling’s protests, the Titans agree not to intervene in the matter. Alerted by Lilith’s precognition, they go instead to S.T.A.R. Labs, where an explosion frees the cryogenically preserved alien, a winged man who instantly becomes enamored of Lilith.

In Qurac, Jericho and Amber are taken captive and reunited with Adeline in a prison cell. Jericho uses his powers to help them get free and to defeat Cheshire. Cheshire and Marlo then escape when Joe chooses not to pursue them in order to save Mario’s purloined art collection from being destroyed by a grenade.

Notes:
>> First full appearance of Azrael this issue.
>> Nightwing battles the mystery man who has taken on the identity of the Vigilante and confronts Adrian Chase in The Vigilante #20 and 21 following this story.


Tales of the Teen Titans #53 [1985]
cover date: May 1985

Credits:
“Devil on the Wing!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: Rich Buckler
Inker: Mike DeCarlo
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Donna and Terry Long return from their honeymoon, even as Lilith is attacked outside Titans Tower by someone claiming to be the Terminator. Lilith and the Titans then return to S.T.A.R. Labs, where the precognitive Titan inexplicably begins to radiate heat and frees the amnesiac winged alien from the testing equipment of the resident scientists. Holding off her teammates with her new powers, Lilith allows the extraterrestrial to escape. The Titans, believing the alien responsible for Lilith’s powers and strange behavior, fruitlessly pursue him through the city in a hectic chase until he unaccountably vanishes from sight.

The young heroes then join Gar Logan and Jillian Jackson at the trial of Slade Wilson, the Terminator, which is being presided over by newly appointed judge Adrian Chase (formerly the Vigilante).

Notes:
>> Donna and Terry Long return from their honeymoon.


Tales of the Teen Titans #54 [1985]
cover date: June 1985

Credits:
“Blind Justice!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: Rich Buckler
Inker: Dick Giordano, Mike DeCarlo
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: Eduardo Barreto

Synopsis: At Slade Wilson’s trial, when it begins to appear as if the Terminator will escape punishment for his crimes, Changeling uses his shape-changing powers to attack Wilson. Subdued by his teammates, Gar Logan is ordered from the courtroom by Judge Adrian Chase. The Teen Titans suspect that someone is posing as the Terminator to make it appear as if the the costumed mercenary and Slade Wilson are not one and the same. They arrange a meeting with Wilson’s associate, Wintergreen, only to be attacked by the Terminator impersonator. The false Terminator escapes before he can be apprehended.

At the same time, unknown to the other Titans, Cyborg returns to S.T.A.R. Labs where preparations are underway to replace his metal body parts with flesh-colored plastic, thus restoring his human appearance. After appearing as a witness at the trial, Lilith privately reveals to the Titans that she had experienced her unexplained heat powers on previous occasions and that they were not caused by the proximity of the winged alien. Angered at the Titans’ unheeding pursuit of the extraterrestrial, she leaves the group.

Back in court, Judge Chase determines that while there is insufficient evidence that Slade Wilson is the Terminator to warrant a full jury trial for his kidnapping of stock broker Samuel Adams, Wilson will nonetheless be sentenced to a year in prison for illegal possession of firearms. Changeling is dismayed at the verdict ,as he had been using Steve Dayton’s mento helmet to masquerade as the Terminator in hopes that Wilson would be set free so that he could kill him for his involvement with Terra.

Notes:
>> Lilith leaves the Titans this issue.


Tales of the Teen Titans #55 [1985]
cover date: July 1985

Credits:
“Shades of Gray”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: Ron Randall
Inker: Ron Randall
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: Eduardo Barreto

Synopsis: Changeling rejects his teammates to talk about the Terminator’s trial, and returns home to find that due to his behavior in court, Steve Dayton is angry with him and Jillian’s father has forbidden her to associate with him. In prison, Slade Wilson arranges through Wintergreen to learn that his ex-wife and son have been cleared of the charges by Interpol and to have his jail sentence suspended. Before he can be released, he is attacked at night in his cell by a maddened Changeling. When their skirmish takes them into the prison yard, Changeling breaks off the fight, promising to return.

The next day, he arranges to meet the Terminator in a battle to the death. The mercenary derails Gar’s plans by appearing at the arranged site as Slade Wilson, rather than in costume as the Terminator, and by refusing to fight back. Unable to bring himself to murder an unresisting opponent, Changeling reluctantly agrees to talk with his enemy instead. Wilson relates how her first encountered Tara Markov when she undertook an assignment he had refused: murder of African tribal leader King Tawaba, who had taken care of Gar after the deaths of his parents years before. Later, the Terminator took Terra in as a partner, but quickly discovered that the girl was an incurable psychopath.Wilson asserts that his son Joseph is innocent of involvement in any criminal actions. Changeling finds himself believing Wilson’s statement despite his earlier convictions to the contrary. Their conversation over, he allows Wilson to leave without trying to stop him.

Notes:
>> It is revealed that Terra killed Chief Tawaba, Changeling’s childhood guardian in Africa.


Tales of the Teen Titans #56 [1985]
cover date: August 1985

Credits:
“Fearsome Five Minus One”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: Chuck Patton
Inker: Mike DeCarlo
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: Chuck Patton & Mike DeCarlo

Synopsis: A small group of costumed men hired by Gizmo of the Fearsome Five, invades the S.T.A.R. research hospital in New York to retrieve the encapsulated form of Nuetron, a nuclear-powered villain who once fought Superman in Metropolis. Abruptly, Raven appears and mercilessly attacks the intruders, almost killing them. When she realizes what she is doing, she breaks off her attack and instead uses her empathic powers, which have increased due to in the increased influence of Trigon, to cure the patients of the hospitals Intensive Care Ward.

Meanwhile, Gar Logan meets the returning Joseph and Adeline Wilson at the aairport and apologizes for his earlier behavior toward Jericho, while Cyborg undergoes the operation tha will restore his normal appearance. When the members of the Fearsome Five stage a break-in at Tri-State Prison, they are resisted by Nightwing, Starfire, and Wonder Girl, the remaining unoccupied Titans. When Nightwing is injured, Starfire forcibly removes him from the encounter by depositing him on a rooftop. Despite the efforts of the two heroines, Psimon and his teammates are able to escape with another encapsulated super-powered prisoner, a woman named Jinx.

Notes:
>> First Appearance of Jinx. Joins the Fearsome Five.
>> Neutron joins the Fearsome Five.


Tales of the Teen Titans #57 [1985]
cover date: September 1985

Credits:
“The End of Cyborg”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: Chuck Patton
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: Chuck Patton &Romeo Tanghal

Synopsis: At Titans Tower, Dick, Donna, and Kory recuperate from their battle with the Fearsome Five with Gar and Joe, while at S.T.A.R., Victor Stone goes through recuperative physical therapy with Dr. Sarah Charles due to his robotic parts being replaced with plastic. The Fearsome Five recruits the sorceress Jinx to their cause, but are unable to free Nuetron from his confining radiation-proof capsule without aid.

Days later, having heard nothing from Cyborg, the Titans learn of his operation from his grandparents, while the Fearsome Five decide to abduct Dr. Jenet Klyburn to help them free Nuetron. Both groups converge on the S.T.A.R. facility, but the super-villains arrive first and kidnap both Dr. Klyburn and Victor Stone, who they don’t recognize as the former Cyborg. Back at the criminal’s headquarters, Victor manages to rig Neutron’s capsule to explode, so that he and Jenet Klyburn can escape in the confusion. As they are leaving, Victor collapseswhen his body begins to reject its new polymer replacement parts. The next morning, Psimon’s image appears at a hastily convened mayoral press conference to demand the surrender of New York City to the Fearsome Five.

Notes:
>> First appearance of Dr. Sarah Charles; Appears as a physical therapist in this story, but later becomes a scientist for S.T.A.R. Labs.


Tales of the Teen Titans #58 [1985]
cover date: October 1985

Credits:
“Victor Victorious!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: Chuck Patton
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: Chuck Patton &Romeo Tanghal

Synopsis: The Fearsome Five appear on the New York waterfront to lay claim to the city, only to be confronted by the police and the Teen Titans. Starfire’s opening blast throws Psimon into the Hudson River, from which he does not resurface. The other super-powered criminals, particularly te revived Neutron, prove harder to subdue, and a pitched battle ensues.

Meanwhile, Psimon finds himself teleported aboard the orbiting satellite of the Monitor, who enlists him in his efforts to stop the destruction of the multiverse, (See Crisis on Infinite Earths), while Victor Stone undergoes surgery to transform him back into Cyborg inorder to save his life.
Nightwing, Wonder Girl, Changeling, and Starfireare defeated, leaving only Jericho to fight the Fearsome Five. He possesses the members one-by-one, forcing them to battle each other, until the Titans have time to recover. By this time, Gizmo and Jinx are unconscious, and Shimmer has been possessed by Jericho. Starfire matches power-blasts with Neutron, while Wonder Girl hurls Mammoth high into the air with her lasso, then drops him directly onto the nuclear villain, which knocks out both criminals.

The titans then visit a recuperating Cyborg in the hospital, after which Jericho is made an official member of the team at the Titans Tower.

Notes:
>> Jericho officially joins the Titans with this issue.
>> Last issue of Tales of the Teen Titans with new material; Begins reprints next issue.
>> Chronologically, the next Titans adventure occurs in New Teen Titans (second series) #1.


Tales of the Teen Titans #59 [1985]
Reprints DC Comics Presents #26 (New Teen Titans preview) and “Reunion” from Best of DC Digest #18;
contains text with an update on Titans history.
New cover by Chuck Patton & Dick Giordano

Tales of the Teen Titans #60 [1985]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #1
New cover by Chuck Patton & Dick Giordano

Tales of the Teen Titans #61 [1986]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #2
New cover by Chuck Patton & Romeo Tanghal

Tales of the Teen Titans #62 [1986]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #3
New cover by Chuck Patton & Dick Giordano

Tales of the Teen Titans #63 [1986]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #4
New cover by Brian Bolland

Tales of the Teen Titans #64 [1986]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #5
New cover by Brian Bolland

Tales of the Teen Titans #65 [1986]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #6
New cover by Brian Bolland

Tales of the Teen Titans #66 [1986]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #7
New cover by Marshal Rogers

Tales of the Teen Titans #67 [1986]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #8
New cover by George Pérez

Tales of the Teen Titans #68 [1986]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #9
New cover by Barry Windsor-Smith

Tales of the Teen Titans #69 [1986]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #10
New cover by Tom Mandrake

Tales of the Teen Titans #70 [1986]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #11
New cover by Steve Bissette & Romeo Tanghal

Tales of the Teen Titans #71 [1986]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #12
New cover by [unknown] & Romeo Tanghal

Tales of the Teen Titans #72 [1986]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #13
New cover by Jose Garcia Lopez

Tales of the Teen Titans #73 [1987]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #14
New cover by Jerry Ordway

Tales of the Teen Titans #74 [1987]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #15
New cover by Ernie Chan & Dick Giordano

Tales of the Teen Titans #75 [1987]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #16
New cover by Shawn McManus

Tales of the Teen Titans #76 [1987]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #17
New cover by Eduardo Barreto & Romeo Tanghal

Tales of the Teen Titans #77 [1987]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #18
New cover by Brian Bolland

Tales of the Teen Titans #78 [1987]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #19
New cover by Jose Garcia-Lopez

Tales of the Teen Titans #79 [1987]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #20
New cover by Kevin Macguire & Terry Austin

Tales of the Teen Titans #80 [1987]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #21
New cover by Mark Bright

Tales of the Teen Titans #81 [1987]
Reprints The New Teen Titans (second series) Annual #2
New cover by John Byrne after Ed Hannigan

Tales of the Teen Titans #82 [1987]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #23
New cover by Ed Hannigan

Tales of the Teen Titans #83 [1987]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #24
New cover by Eduardo Barreto & Romeo Tanghal

Tales of the Teen Titans #84 [1987]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #25
New cover by Unknown

Tales of the Teen Titans #85 [1988]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #26
New cover by Unknown

Tales of the Teen Titans #86 [1988]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #27
New cover by Eduardo Barreto & Ed Hannigan

Tales of the Teen Titans #87 [1988]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #28
New cover by Kerry Gammil & Dick Giordano

Tales of the Teen Titans #88 [1988]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #29
New cover by Mike Collins

Tales of the Teen Titans #89 [1988]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #30
New cover by Rob Liefeld & George Pérez

Tales of the Teen Titans #90 [1988]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #31
New cover by Mike Bair & Mark Beachum

Tales of the Teen Titans #91 [1988]
Reprints New Teen Titans (second series) #32
New cover by Mike Collins & Romeo Tanghal
FINAL ISSUE


Annuals


New Teen Titans Annual #1 [1982]
cover date: November 1982

Credits:
“War!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Romeo Tanghal
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis:Starfire recovers and attacks her sister, beginning a new skirmish between Titans and aliens, until Lord Damyn’s Psion advisor takes control of the Citadel forces. He then pits Starfire against Blackfire in a duel to the death, ostensibly to decide Komand’r’s succession and the fate of Tamaran, although he secretly plans a double-cross. Meanwhile, aboard the Omega Men’s ship, Wonder Girl, Kid Flash, and Raven learn the origin of X’Hal from Primus and Kalista.

Once the greatest warrior of the Vegan system, X’Hal was primarily responsible for repelling a Psion invasion, and was therefore made the Vegans’ high priestess and ruler. The Psions returned, however, killing X’Hal and experimenting on her lifeless body, eventually converting it to pure energy, which unexpectedly brought her back to life as a powerful battle goddess. Destroying the attacking Psions, she then turned her uncontrolled power against her own people, destroying three of the twenty-five Vegan worlds.before she could be captured and brought under control by those who would later become the Warlords of Okaara.

On Tamaran’s surface, the death-duel results in Blackfire’s seeming demise, but triggers a series of explosions that will wipe out the Vegan system (as the Psion had planned), even as the other Titans and the Omega Men are reunited on the Citadel homeworld. Vega is saved only when X’Hal breaks free and detonates the explosives harmlessly. Raven heals the badly injured Starfire, after which Koriand’r is reunited briefly with her parents and brother before returning to Earth with her teammates.

Notes:
>> The story continues from New Teen Titans #25 and continues in New Teen Titans #26.
>> This issue includes pin-ups of Kid Flash, Robin, and Wonder Girl by George Perez.
>> Blackfire appears next in New Teen Titans (second series) #14.
>> Starfire is reunited with her family in this story; Myand’r, Luand’r, and Ryand’r (Starfire’s family), and other inhabitants of Tamaran – all last seen in flashbacks in New Teen Titans #3 and Tales of the New Teen Titans #4 – appear next in New Teen Titans (second series) #1.


New Teen Titans Annual #2 [1983]
cover date: 1982

Credits:
“The Murder Machine”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez (layouts only)
Inker: Pablo Marcos (finished art)
Editor: Len Wein
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Adrian Chase and his family are rushed to Mercy Hospital after the firebombing of their apartment. Although declared clinically dead for seven minutes before being resuscitated, Chase survives, but his wife and children are killed. Anthony Scarapelli, who is responsible for the attack, is scheduled to be “disciplined” for his unwise actions by his Mafia superior, Donna Omicidlo. Despite a court order to the contrary, Robin begins a campaign of harassment against the mob leader. Though they have misgivings about his attitude and methods, the other Teen Titans agree to help Robin prove Scarapelli’s guilt, and they begin raiding the sites of his various illegal enterprises.

Panicked, Scarapelli calls on the aid of the Monitor, who provides him with six super-powered assassins (Scorcher, Spear, Bazooka, Slasher, Tanker, and Cheshire) to use against the Titans, and troops to protect him from the Mafia godmother. In a deadly warehouse battle between the Titans and the assassins, the young heroes survive only with the unseen aid of a mysterious figure, who saves the lives of Changeling and Kid Flash by killing their assailants, Slasher and Scorcher. The wounded Changeling, and Kid Flash, who was saved from death at Cheshire’s hands by Raven, are sidelined, but Robin, using information on a tape sent to him by Chase, continues with his plan. The Titans intervene to prevent Scarapelli’s Monitor-provided troops from wiping out Donna Omicidio and her men.

Robin himself goes to Scarapelli’s home, where the mobster, about to flee the country, has been attacked by the mystery man from the warehouse fight. This costumed avenger, who calls himself the Vigilante, proves to be Adrian Chase in a new identity. When Robin confronts Chase, Scarapelli pulls a gun and shoots both Robin and Vigilante a split-second before Chase returns fire. The police arrive to find Scarapelli dead, Robin wounded, and no sign of Scarapelli’s assailant. Robin decides to remain silent regarding the Vigilante and his true identity.

Notes:
>> The story continues from New Teen Titans #34.
>> First appearance of Adrian Chase as The Vigilante.
>> First appearance of Cheshire; serves as one of Monitor’s troops; appears next in Tales of the New Teen Titans #51.
>> First appearance of The Scorcher; serves as one of Monitor’s troops; dies in this story.
>> First appearance of Slasher; serves as one of Monitor’s troops; dies in this story.
>> First appearance of Spear ; serves as one of Monitor’s troops.
>> First appearance of Bazooka; serves as one of Monitor’s troops.
>> First appearance of Tanker; serves as one of Monitor’s troops.


Tales of the Teen Titans Annual #3 [1984]
cover date: 1984

Credits:
“The Judas Contract: Part 4: The Finale!”
Co-plotter, Scripter: Marv Wolfman
Co-plotter, Penciller: George Pérez (layouts)
Inker: Mike DeCarlo, Dick Giordano (finished art)
Editor: Marv Wolfman & George Pérez
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: Held captive by the H.I.V.E. in an Enervator, which uses their own powers to hold them helpless, the Titans are shocked at the Terminator’s revelation that Terra is his partner. Meanwhile, Nightwing and Jericho attempt to breach the criminal organization’s headquarters, and Adeline Wilson keeps Wintergreen from aiding the Terminator.

Wintergreen then reveals to her the origin of his relationship with Slade Wilson. He and the future Terminator had served together under a General Sampson, who ordered Wilson to lead what Wintergreen regarded as a suicide mission. Wilson survived the mission only because Wintergreen defied orders in order to save his life. When Wintergreen again found himself under Sampson’s command in Vietnam, the general deliberately assigned him to a similarly deadly mission, which resulted in his capture by the enemy. Slade Wilson returned the earlier favor by using his special powers and costumed identity to rescue his friend.

Jericho’s powers of possession enable him and Nightwing to penetrate to the heart of the H.I.V.E. stronghold, but they are overpowered and captured when they unexpectedly encounter Terra. The acquisition of Nightwing, whom they recognize as the former Robin, completes the roster of the Titans and fulfills the Terminator’s contract, but when he realizes that his son will share the Titans’ fate, the Terminator bargains for Jericho’s release.

Jericho abruptly regains consciousness and possesses his father, causing him to free the Titans from the Enervator. Believing that the Terminator has betrayed her, Terra attacks him. In the ensuing confusion, the Titans defeat the assembled H.I.V.E. agents, and Jericho releases the Terminator from his power to allow him to defend himself. A three-way conflict then erupts among the Titans, Terra, and the Terminator. Raven attempts to stop Terra with her mental powers, while Jericho breaks a standoff between the Terminator and the Titans, downing the villain.

Then Terra breaks free of Raven’s influence, and her last semblance of sanity vanishes. In a mad rage, she uses her full power – demolishing the entire complex and bringing the wreckage down on herself. Digging frantically, the Changeling at last finds Terra’s lifeless body. The next day, a small funeral service is held, attended by the Titans, the Outsiders, Batman and Robin, Terry Long, and Dr. Jace.

Notes:
>> Origin and background of Deathstroke, The Terminator revealed this issue.
>> Backgrounds and origins of Wintergreen and Adeline Kane also revealed in this story.
>> Death of Terra.


Specials


Marvel and DC Present the Uncanny X-Men and the New Teen Titans #1
cover date: 1982

Credits:
“Apokolips… Now”
Writer: Chris Claremont
Penciller: Walt Simonson
Inker: Terry Austin
Editors, plotters: Jim Shooter (editor-in-chief) and Louise Jones and Len Wein (consulting editor)
Cover Art: Walt Simonson (penciler) and Terry Austin (inker; Signed)

Synopsis:The image of their late teammate, Phoenix, appears in dreams to the X-Men, and to Raven of the New Teen Titans, seeming to warn of a coming catastrophe. At the same time, Robin encounters the Terminator working in partnership with one of Darkseid’s Para-Demons. When Starfire reveals the history of the Dark Phoenix to her comrades, the Titans investigate the connection between Phoenix and the X-Men. They are mistaken for the mutant heroes by attacking Para-Demons and captured, along with Professor X, by Darkseid, the demonic lord of Apokolips.

Meanwhile, the Terminator, sent by Darkseid to gather Phoenix’s residual energies from locales where she had expended a great deal of power, is able to defeat and capture the real X-Men. Drawing on their memories of their deceased partner-in-peril, Darkseid is able to use the gathered energies to bring Dark Phoenix back to life, after which he intends to use her power to transform Earth into a second Apokolips. Freed of their bonds with the evil god’s departure, the Teen Titans and the X-Men meet for the first time, and discover the abandoned Mobius Chair of Metron of the New Gods, which they use to travel back to New York to fight a return match against the Terminator.

They are then attacked in turn by Darkseid and Dark Phoenix, and in the ensuing battle Raven and Professor X psychically weaken the Phoenix-entity so that she/it is forced to possess the body of Cyclops to survive. Reunion with her former lover returns Phoenix’s memory of her life as Jean Grey, and she turns on Darkseid in revenge for his having reawakened her from death. In a mammoth explosion, both Darkseid and Dark Phoenix vanish, and Metron regains the Mobius Chair.

Notes:
>> All characters in this story are inhabitants of an “alternate universe” which parallels both DC Comics and the Marvel Universe, and in which the X-Men and the New Teen Titans (i.e. their parallel counterparts) coexist.
>> The events of this story, involving as they do only the counterparts of the familiar Teen Titans and X-Men characters (teamed as the “X-Titans” in this story), do not affect the continuity of either feature; however, this story would appear to take place just after the Blackfire series in New Teen Titans (following page 7 of New Teen Titans #26) and just before the Broodworld series in X-Men (sometime after X-Men #153) as it reflects events on its parallel world.
>> The one-shot was supposed to be followed up by another X-Men/New Teen Titans special, by Marv Wolfman and George Pérez, featuring Brother Blood and the Hellfire Club. The special never made it past planning stages.


The New Teen Titans Drug Awareness Giveaway #1 [1983]
cover date: 1983

Credits:
“Plague!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: George Pérez
Inker: Dick Giordano
Editor: Dave Manak
Cover Art: George Pérez

Synopsis: In a criminal warehouse laboratory, the Teen Titans find a drug-addicted youngster close to death from an overdose, and they rush him to a hospital. Unfortunately, the youth dies despite their efforts. When Raven senses the nearby presence of the deceased boy’s drug-using friends, including his sister Anna, the Titans try to help them, but the youngsters refuse to be persuaded, even when Speedy tells the story of his own days as a junkie (as shown in Green Lantern (second series) #85 and 86).

Back at the hospital where another teenager, Debbie O’Hara, has been admitted to the detoxification center, her younger brother Teddy gives the Titans a lead to the drug’ pushers’ whereabouts. While Cyborg, Starfire, and the Protector break up one,end of the drug connection, and Speedy, Changeling, and Wonder Girl stop the dissemination of the drugs on the streets, Anna and her friends, all high on drugs, attend and disrupt the funeral of Anna’s brother. When Anna is reconciled with her parents and when Debbie makes a successful recovery, the other youngsters talk it over and enter a hospital program in order to quit their drug habit.

Notes:
>> This comic is a special giveaway intended for distribution in schools, and published in association with the Keebler Company and in cooperation with the President’s Drug Awareness Campaign. Besides the New Teen Titans story, It includes a message from Nancy Reagan and five activity pages.
>> First appearance of The Protector, a costumed crime-fighter specializing in drug-related crimes; first name, Jason, and last name, Hart, revealed in next issue.
>> One problem cropped up with the book as Wolfman and Titans artist George Pérez began work on it: Robin, the leader of The Teen Titans, couldn’t be used. This book was being sponsored by Keebler, and Robin was already licensed by Nabisco. So Marv Wolfman came up with a new character, The Protector. The art was done, so Dave Manak did all the corrections to turn Robin into The Protector.
>> Hanna Barbera produced a 60-second anti-drug spot in the early eighties using Titans characters. It was the only animated appearance of the New Teen Titans. The commercial also included the Protector.


The New Teen Titans Drug Awareness Giveaway #2 [1983]
cover date: 1983

Credits:
“Battle!”
Writer: Marv Wolfman
Penciller: Ross Andru
Inker: Joe Giella
Editor: Dave Manak
Cover Art: Ross Andru

Synopsis: After the Titans help the Protector round up another gang of drug smugglers near Blue Valley, the Protector asks Kid Flash t~ keep an eye on his cousin, Ted Hart, a reformed drug-user newly moved to the town. While Ted attends school and begins dating Amy King, a friend of Wally West’s, the young super-heroes find themselves at a loss to learn the time and place of a large incoming drug shipment.

As weeks pass, Ted is tempted into using drugs again by Coral, the girlfriend of Adam, the local pusher, when she convinces him that even Amy is secretly a user. When Amy goes to Wally West to get help for Ted, he contacts the Protector as Kid Flash, but even the two super-heroes cannot talk Ted and his friend Brian into going straight. Finally, desperate for money to pay for drugs, the two attempt to hold up a grocery store, and Brian is shot by the owner. Ted escapes and winds, up on Amy’s doorstep, near collapse.

The Protector and the Titans, meanwhile, locate the drug drop site by following Adam and Coral. Even as they defeat the criminals, Raven senses Ted’s paid from afar, and teleports away to help him. Ted and Brian are soon visited in the hospital by their parents, their girlfriends, and the Teen Titans. They both vow to stay off drugs for good.

Notes:
>> This comic is a special giveaway intended for distribution in schools, and published in association with the Keebler Company and in cooperation with the President’s Drug Awareness Campaign. Besides the New Teen Titans story, It includes a message from Nancy Reagan and five activity pages.
>> The back cover features an illustration of the Protector and the New Teen Titans by George Pérez, reproduced from the back cover of issue #1, with the figure of Kid Flash substituted for that of Speedy.


The New Teen Titans Drug Awareness Giveaway #3 [1983]
cover date: 1983

Credits:
“Problem Child”
Plot: Marv Wolfman
Script: Joey Cavalieri
Penciller: Ross Andru
Inker: Joe Giella
Editor: Dave Manak
Cover Art: Ross Andru

Synopsis:The Protector and the Teen Titans are guests at a high school anti-drug lecture when a young boy named Jesse, who has been providing drugs to his classmates, stands up and denounces the heroes’ message as a lie, and then runs out of the auditorium. When Changeling and Raven follow him to keep him from hurting himself in his drug-induced frenzy, Raven’s soul-self gives Jesse a nightmare vision of his older brother, who first introduced him to drug use, as a corpse-like figure. Raven tries to use her powers to ease Jesse’s pain, but in so doing, she unintentionally allows the drugs to affect her as well.

As Starfire flies Raven to a hospital, Jesse realizes for the first time the effect the drugs are having on him, and resolves not only to quit, but to help his friends quit, as well. The Titans track down Jesse’s brother, Dave, then allow him to escape, hoping he will unwittingly lead them to his supplier, which he does. The Titans and the Protector bring the drug dealers to justice and a repentent Dave joins his brother in swearing off drugs.

Notes:
>> This comic is a special giveaway intended for distribution in schools, and published in association with the Keebler Company and in cooperation with the President’s Drug Awareness Campaign. Besides the New Teen Titans story, It includes a message from Nancy Reagan and five activity pages.


Appearances of Note: 1980-1985

IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER (see series index above for detailed synopsis of each)

Action Comics #546 [1983]: The New Teen Titans guest star and help Superman battle the new, deadlier Brainiac. This story takes place between New Teen Titans #34 and #39.

Action Comics #584 [1987]: Superman & The Teen Titans. This is the first Action Comics issue after Crisis, which turns into a team-up book until #600. By John Byrne. Superman runs amok in the city, and the Teen Titans try to contain him. They finally do when Jericho possesses him. A teen on crutches arrives claiming to be the real Superman. The teen is revealed to be David Gunderson, who used a mind transference device on Superman. The Titans restore Superman to his rightful body.

Batman and the Outsiders #5 and New Teen Titans #37 [1983]: Fearsome Five member Gizmo breaks his villain group out of prison; Under Psimon’s leadership, the Fearsome Five kidnap Dr. Helga Jace and force her to make them a group of Mud Men to help in their battles; Dick Grayson tells Bruce Wayne that he wants to terminate their heroic partnership; The Titans and the Outsiders team up to defeat the Fearsome Five after the villains expel Dr. Light from the group and attempt to kill him; Robin chafes under Batman’s leading the two groups in battle and takes over, proving that Robin does not always have to be in Batman’s shadow. Terra is reunited with her brother, Geo-Force, in this story.

Best of DC (Blue Ribbon Digest) #18 [1981]: This DC Digest contained mostly reprints of Teen Titans comics from the 1970’s. In addition, however, was an original 10-page tale called “Reunion.” Written by Marv Wolfman with art by Carmine Infantino; After an unsuccessful attempt to halt a drug-smuggling operation, former Titans Speedy and Aqualad join forces with the New Titans to close the case. Speedy is established as a government agent in this story. Reprinted Stories: “Titans Fit the Battle of Jericho” (from Teen Titans #20); “Citadel of Fear” (from Teen Titans #21); “Halfway to Holocaust” (from Teen Titans #22); “Skis of Death” (from Teen Titans #24; previously reprinted in DC Super Stars #1).

Crisis on Infinite Earths #1-12 [1985-1986]: It was the end of everything! Countless universes were erased from existence in a spreading tide of antimatter unleashed by the Anti-Monitor, a being of undiluted hate birthed at the moment of creation. Salvation lay with the Monitor, the Anti-Monitor’s positive number, who rallied the surviving defenders of infinite worlds to spare the doomed Multiverse. Valiant heroes – the Flash and Supergirl among them – died battling the Anti-Monitor and his Shadow Demons. At the dawn of time, the champions of five remaining Earths made their stand, guided by the Monitor’s enigmatic protégé Harbinger. Watching helpless as the otherworldly Spectre grappled with the Anti-Monitor, those heroes witnessed the rebirth of a single universe, with one Earth and one unified reality. In the final conflict, the Anti-Monitor sent this reborn Earth to the antimatter universe, where the greatest assemblage of super-humans ever known ended his threat for all time – though continuity in the DC Universe was forever altered in his wake.

Effects in the Titansverse
>> Character histories were altered by Crisis on Infinite Earths. Most infamously, Donna Troy. Also affected were Dick Grayson, Lilith, Mal Duncan, Harlequin, Gnarrk, Bat-Girl/Flamebird, Golden Eagle, and Kole. Other characters have had elements of their backstories refined, but nothing has been severely altered or negated (such as additions like the Flash Year One arc or speed force revelations). See Secret Origins Annual #3 (the post-Crisis origin of the team), New Titans #50-55 (Who Is Wonder Girl?) and New Titans #56 (a Titans flashback with Gnarrk) for all the post-Crisis revisions.
>> Kid Flash becomes the Flash in Crisis on Infinite Earths #12.
>> Aquagirl dies in Crisis on Infinite Earths #9-10; Tula drowns in a body of water poisoned by the toxic waste of the mindless villain, Chemo. The Atlantean doctors try to save her life but fail.
>> Dove I dies in Crisis on Infinite Earths #12; Don died during the Crisis while trying to save a child from being crushed by a crumbling wall, the two Lords of Chaos and Order revoking his powers in order to cause his death.
>> Kole dies in Crisis on Infinite Earths #12; She dies trying to save innocent bystanders from the Anti-Monitor’s shadow demons during the Crisis. Her body was never found.

DC Comics Presents #26 [1980]: featuring a 16-page preview to New Teen Titans! In the midst of a confrontation with terrorists, Robin finds himself drawn repeatedly into a dream-adventure in which he is a member of a revived Teen Titans team. The New Teen Titans’ members include Kid Flash, Wonder Girl, Beast Boy (now called the Changeling), and three new super-powered crimefighters: Cyborg, Starfire, and Raven. Robin helps police capture the terrorists, while simultaneously aiding his mystifying new “teammates” to battle an extradimensional protoplasmic creature running amok at S.T.A.R. Laboratories. Unknown to the Teen Wonder, his hallucination is engineered by Raven as part of her plan to eventually recruit the New Teen Titans as her allies against the demon Trigon. First appearances of Raven, Cyborg & Starfire. Beast Boy now known as Changeling.

DC Sampler #1 [1983]: Contains previews of upcoming DC Comics in the coming year. A two-page spread by Marv Wolfman and George Pérez features original George Pérez art and teasers for each member. This preview was released shortly before New Teen Titans #39.

DC Sampler #2 [1984]: Contains previews of upcoming DC Comics in the coming year. A two-page spread by Marv Wolfman and George Pérez features original George Pérez art and teasers for future plots. This preview was released around New Teen Titans (second series) #1.

DC Sampler #3 [1985]: Contains previews of upcoming DC Comics in the coming year. A two-page spread features the Titans and Legion playing volleyball by Dan Jurgens – advertising the fact both books have two adventures per month. This preview was released around New Teen Titans (second series) #10.

Supergirl #20 [1984]: Supergirl’s 25th anniversary is honored, and editor Julius Schwartz and writer Paul Kupperberg celebrate it with an Action crossover story involving her cousin Superman. The story will run in Action #555 and Supergirl #20; it features the villainy of the Parasite, who “puts the two through the same situation to show how different their thought processes and reactions are,” explains Schwartz. By pitting them against the same series of menaces in a “parallel” story, he wants to spotlight character differences between the two. This will segue into a sequence in which Supergirl is greeted and applauded in Midvale by the Justice League and the Teen Titans and honored with a huge sculpture. The New Teen Titans have a cameo appearance as a statue of Supergirl is unveiled, celebrating the anniversary of her arrival on earth.

Vigilante #3 [1984]: Guest-starring Cyborg. Captain Hall asks Cyborg to escort a criminal named Stryker to Attica prison. Stryker was arrested for a laundry list of crimes from child slavery, prostitution to drug running. He got a light sentence on a technicality, prompting Vigilante to hunt him to mete out justice. Cyborg tries to reason with Vigilante as he engages him in combat. As Vigilante defeats Cyborg, he aims his gun at Stryker, but is unable to pull the trigger. Vigilante coerces a taped confession, which Nightwing believes will provide enough leads to nail Stryker. Vigilante sends Cyborg a ‘get well’ card, that reads, “Please get better. Thanks to you, I have.”

Vigilante #20-21 [1985]: Nightwing appears in a two-parter. The day Adrian Chase became a judge, he quit being the Vigilante. In the meantime, the Vigilante continues his midnight prowls, far worse than ever. He’s going around killing people right and left. Adrian is having nightmares, finds it very hard to sleep, and wakes up incredibly tired. He’s not quite sure what’s going on. All he knows is that the Vigilante is killing people and he doesn’t remember. Nightwing tracks down an increasingly more violent Vigilante. Meanwhile, Adrian Chase continues to suffer from nightmares and is unsure whether he is commiting the acts or someone else has assumed the Vigilante identity. Nightwing tracks down Chase, and as they fight, Nightwing sees a live-action report of the violent Vigilante – which seemingly clears Chase. Nightwing allows Chase to find the answer himself, but vows to return if the matter is not settled.

World’s Finest #300 [1984]: Batman and Superman enlist the aid of the Justice League and the Outsiders when alien seeds start causing earthquakes. The seeds threaten to grow into cosmic trees that act as a beacon to alien forces. Meanwhile, the Titans react to the strange alien seeds at the Titans Tower in a four page segment by Marv Wolfman and George Pérez. This Titans segment fits shortly after the events of New Teen Titans (first series) #39.

Wonder Woman (first series) #287 [1982]: When Doctor Cyber and Doctor Moon kidnap Wonder Girl, it’s up to Wonder Woman and the New Teen Titans to rescue her. The events of this issue have been negated by the Crisis on Infinite Earths.

Wonder Woman (first series) #293 [1982]: “Countdown to Chaos: Book Three” It’s girl-power to the rescue as Wonder Woman joins forces with Wonder Girl, Starfire, Raven, Supergirl, Power Girl, Black Canary and the Huntress. The events of this issue have been negated by the Crisis on Infinite Earths.


 


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