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Series Index: Hawk & Dove v1



Hawk & Dove #1 [September 1968] to Hawk & Dove #6 [July 1969]

A mysterious voice gave Hank and Don Hall heightened physical prowess and costumes that magically appeared whenever their owners were in danger. Their opposing views on violence determined the super-heroes they became – the angry Hawk and the pacifist Dove.

The central conflict of their own series,came not from the heroes’ battles with the criminal element in their home town of Elmond, but from their differing and extremist ideologies, which had led to the Voice’s bestowing upon them their particular heroic identities. Hank Hall, the elder brother by not more than a year, was a militant, believing in physical force as a solution to problems, especially those encountered as a super-hero. As the Hawk, he tended to charge into battle with fists flailing first, and to ask questions later, if at all. His only uncertainty in his heroic role came from the fact that while his strength and agility had been dramatically increased, he still had to contend with a fear of heights, a phobia unaffected in the transformation to his costumed persona. Don Hall, the younger brother, tended to socialize with the young collegiate crowd who could more easily appreciate his philosophy of pacifism.

Seeing violence as an abhorrent last resort in resolving any dilemma, the Dove was the pensive member of the partnership, who tried to use brains rather than brawn to defeat their opponents. His major problem was that his very ideals gave him grave doubts about the entire idea of being a super-hero, and while his quiet reason was often a welcome alternative to the Hawk’s quick-tempered reactionism, his indecisiveness in action made him somewhat less than effective as a crimebuster. The running verbal battles between the two heroes were further complicated when their father, Irwin Hall, a tough-minded but highly respected judge, who was unaware of his sons’ secret identities, publicly and privately disapproved of the Hawk and the Dove as lawless vigilantes, taking the duties of the appointed police into their own hands without official sanction. Judge Hall’s views provided a middle-of-the-road alternative to the extreme and totally opposed beliefs of the two heroes.

Bearing the distinctive stamp of Steve Ditko, the strip is enhanced by the scripting of Steve Skeates. Only the first two issues and the strip’s debut in Showcase #75 are drawn by Ditko. Gil Kane worked on later issues, but failed to match Ditko’s intensity.


Series Index:
Hawk & Dove #1-6

Crossover Index:
Showcase #75
Teen Titans #21, 25-29, 50-52
Brave & The Bold #181
Crisis on Infinite Earths #12

Key Issues and Storylines:
Showcase #75: Origin and first appearance of Hawk & Dove.
Hawk & Dove #1: Dismayed by Hawk’s violent vigilantism, Don Hall vows never to become the Dove again.
Teen Titans #25: Hawk & Dove join the Teen Titans.
Crisis on Infinite Earths #12: Dove is killed in battle.

Notable Creative Runs:
Steve Skeates, Writer: Showcase #75, Hawk & Dove #1-6
Steve Ditko, Artist: Showcase #75, Hawk & Dove #1-2
Gil Kane, Artist: Hawk & Dove #3-6


Series Index: Hawk & Dove v1


Showcase #75 [1966]: A mysterious Voice gives heightened physical abilities and costumed identities which can be magically assumed in the presence of injustice to two high-school student brothers, Hank and Don Hall, whose heroic alter egos resemble their personal philosophies: Hank, a militant, becomes the violent, quick-tempered Hawk, and Don, a pacifist, becomes the quiet, reasoning, but indecisive Dove. Their efforts to combat organized crime in their home town of Elmond and to foil the attempted murder of their father, a tough-minded but respected judge, are complicated when, unaware of their true identities, their father disapproves of the Hawk and the Dove as lawless vigilantes. First appearance and origins of Hawk & Dove.

Hawk & Dove (first series) #1 [1968]: Dismayed by his father’s strong stand against the Hawk’s violent vigilantism, Don Hall vows never to become the Dove again, but is nevertheless forced into action when he learns the true identity of the leader of a criminal gang, the Drop-Outs, and that the Hawk may be walking into a death-trap.

Hawk & Dove (first series) #2 [1968]: While vacationing on their uncle’s farm, Hank and Don Hall are forced to assume their costumed identities to protect their parents from escaped convicts.

Hawk & Dove (first series) #3 [1968]: Their efforts to stop the criminal known as the Cat prove disastrous for both the Hawk and the Dove: Hawk’s battle with the Cat only results in the destruction of property and more bad publicity for him, while Dove’s attempt to curtail a violent confrontation between the criminal and the police results in the unnecessary shooting of the Cat. Second Story: When a friend’s father is beaten up by a loan shark’s underlings, Hawk goes after the perpetrators while Dove tries to stop the victim’s son from taking a costly revenge.

Hawk & Dove (first series) #4 [1969]: Don Hall is questioned by police when an artist friend is murdered; Hawk foils a museum robbery only to find that apparently nothing has been taken; and a new mayoral candidate takes an even stronger stand against costumed crimefighters than Judge Hall. Hawk and Dove put the clues together to discover that candidate Heinsite is secretly behind the substitution of valuable artworks with forgeries painted by Don’s friend, who was killed when he threatened to talk to the police.

Hawk & Dove (first series) #5 [1969]: A man who once saved their father’s life is accused of robbery, and Hawk and Dove discover that the two wit-nesses against him are members of a hot car ring. When Hawk is critically injured (though not shot, as claimed on the cover), Dove horrifies himself when he abandons his pacifism and beats the supposed killer unmercifully. The story continues in part in Teen Titans #21, in which Hawk and Dove team up with the Teen Titans immediately following this story.

Hawk & Dove (first series) #6 [1969]: Hawk and Dove pursue their usual separate methods to locate the kidnapper of their father and to rescue the judge, only to find that he still disapproves of their crime-fighting activities. This is the final issue of The Hawk and the Dove. The Hawk and the Dove again team up with the Teen Titans in Teen Titans #25, following this story and become semi-permanent members of their team.

Brave & The Bold #181 [1979]: Both disillusioned with life in the present and its failure to live up to the expectations of either of their personal philosophies, Hank and Don are forced to change with the times when the Voice returns to strip them of their powers until such time as they prove worthy of them. This story is features out-of-continuity ‘older’ versions of characters. Next appearance in Tales of the Teen Titans #50.

Crisis on Infinite Earths #12 [1985]: The heroes rally against the forces of the Anti-Monitor, including his Shadow-Demons. As Hawk and Dove help civilians, Dove is overcome by a Shadow-Demon. Death of Dove.


Crossovers & Appearances of Note

IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

Brave & The Bold #181 [1979]: Both disillusioned with life in the present and its failure to live up to the expectations of either of their personal philosophies, Hank and Don are forced to change with the times when the Voice returns to strip them of their powers until such time as they prove worthy of them. This story is features out-of-continuity ‘older’ versions of characters. Next appearance in Tales of the Teen Titans #50.

Crisis on Infinite Earths #12 [1985]: The heroes rally against the forces of the Anti-Monitor, including his Shadow-Demons. As Hawk and Dove help civilians, Dove is overcome by a Shadow-Demon. Death of Dove.

Secret Origins #28 [1989]: The definitive origin of Hawk and Dove.

Teen Titans #21 [1969]: On the trail of the criminals (from the previous issue), the Titans run afoul of the Hawk and the Dove, who are after the same gang for different reasons. After a brief altercation, Wonder Girl accompanies Hawk and Dove through a teleportation device to a gang hideout in Istanbul, while Robin, Kid Flash, and Speedy battle another segment of the organization in Berlin. Both teams are defeated and captured, but Hawk, Dove, and Wonder Girl escape in time to rescue Speedy from being crushed beneath a gigantic machine. Hawk and Dove, sensing their mystic transformation back into Hank and Don Hall about to occur, are forced to abandon the case, leaving Speedy and Wonder Girl to search for Robin and Kid Flash, who are still prisoners of the Dimension X aliens.

Teen Titans #25-29 [1970]: The Teen Titans meet Lilith and are soon framed for killing Dr. Arthur Swenson, a famous philanthropist and pacifist; After being reprimanded for their part in the killing by their Justice League mentors, the young heroes are recruited, through Lilith, by Mr. Jupiter, one of the world’s richest men and the financier of a secret government-sponsored training project for teenagers. Robin declines Mr. Jupiter’s offer in order to pursue his own career and attend college, but Kid Flash, Wonder Girl, Speedy, Hawk, and Dove, together with Lilith, become students in the new program, forsaking their costumes and superpowers for the duration. Hawk and Dove join the Titans in issue #25. Their responsibilities in Elmond force them to quit in issue #29.

Teen Titans #50-52 [1976]: Titans West, comprised of Golden Eagle, Flamebird, Hawk, Dove and Beast Boy, is formed by Lilith; Captain Calamity/Mr. Esper battles the two Titan groups; Lilith and her “Titans West” group, including Gnarrk, rescue victims of more incredible disasters, and discover a connection between these events and the crimes of Captain Calamity on the East Coast. Robin and the Titans’ “first team” defeat Captain Calamity’s henchmen. First appearance of Titans West in issue #50.

Tales of the Teen Titans #50 [1985]: Donna Troy and Terry Long wed this issue. Appearances by just about every Titan, past and present.


 


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